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Although he was barely out of diapers when Kool Moe Dee battled Busy Bee, hip hop archeologist Edan has such a knowledge and passion for the music that you'd think he unearthed it himself. Reluctant to be labeled a rap expert, Edan's insight into the...
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Κείμενο Zoot Simms

Although he was barely out of diapers when Kool Moe Dee battled Busy Bee, hip hop archeologist Edan has such a knowledge and passion for the music that you’d think he unearthed it himself. Reluctant to be labeled a rap expert, Edan’s insight into the golden era is clearly reflected in his songs. “I’ve just done my homework, that’s all,” says the 24-year-old hip hop junkie when asked to explain obscure references like Super Lover Cee and Casanova Rudd. “I can appreciate the idea of music being fun. Artists in the 80s were really eager to express themselves, and it’s apparent in the music. There was still this whole wonderment to rap music. When things first started, compensation wasn’t even an issue. There was no payoff other than rocking a party.” It’s basically impossible to find a feel-good hip hop record in this day and age that isn’t a watered-down commercial or just plain corny. Edan’s music, however, combines 1988 sensibilities with a hard-edged, bedroom-production style that prevents it from traipsing off into ethereal tutti-frutti territory. And lyrically, he packs enough boxcutter references to stay away from the lame-ass playfulness of his fellow ’80s revivalists. Ask him what irks him about today’s sonic landscape and he won’t complain about P. Diddy and Loon. Rather, he’ll point out the heavy marketing behind so-called MC battles and the hardcore rappers’ inherent shook-ness. “Hip hop is now just a platform to get defensive, like the audience is some kind of threat to the artist. Even cats that came hard or had diss records back in the day did it with more of a sense of purpose and a unique sound.” In a time when mainstream hip hop acts refuse to smile during photo shoots or laugh during videos, most old-school-bred new-school MCs fight back with geekazoid rhymes and bad breakbeats. Stuck in a class by himself, Edan simply stresses the importance to stop for a history lesson before the future of hip hop goes the way of the dinosaur. Check out Edan’s current opus, Primitive Plus (Solid) and look out for the Sprain Your Tape Deck EP (Lewis Recordings). Edan’s quick list of 10 must-have 80s hip hop classics
1. T-La Rock, It’s Yours (1984) 2. Ultra-magnetic MC’s, Critical Beatdown (1986) 3. Just-Ice, Back to the Old School (1986) 4. Super Kids, Tragedy Don’t Do It (1985) 5. Top Priority, Let the Homicide Begin (1983) 6. Treacherous 3, New Rap Language (1983) 7. Craig G, Shout (1985) 8. Grandmaster Flash & the Furious 5, “The Message” (1980) 9. Marley Marl, “The Bridge” and “Marley’s Scratch” (1986) 10. Biz Markie, Make the Music EP (1986)