Identity

Trump Denies 'Muslim Ban,' Details Plans to Restrict Muslims from Entering US

During an interview with ABC News, Trump attempted to give more insight into "not the Muslim ban," explaining that he would instead impose restrictions on entry for "countries that have tremendous terror."
January 27, 2017, 5:05pm

Below is what happened on Trump's fourth day in office. You can find out what damage was done every other day so far on the Saddest Calendar on the Internet.

During what has felt like the longest week in an indeterminate amount of time, Trump has proposed a never-ending list of unprecedented executive orders.

Today, it's expected that he'll give his official executive order related to what he's claiming is "not the Muslim ban." Skepticism is appropriate here, as Trump has never quite succeeded in conveying his intentions through the spoken word.

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On Wednesday evening, around the same time that hundreds of New Yorkers were gathering under the Washington Square Arch to rally against the anti-immigration, Islamophobic demagogue, ABC News was preparing to air Trump's first television interview as President. During the interview, he attempted to give more insight into "not the Muslim ban," explaining that he would instead impose restrictions on entry for "countries that have tremendous terror."

The rest of the programming included phrases like "extreme vetting," "evil intentions," and "it's going to be very hard to come in."

For actual information about the order's potential implications, The Huffington Post gleaned the following from an unofficial draft yesterday:

  • Blocking refugees from war-torn Syria from entering the U.S. indefinitely.
  • Suspending all refugee admissions for 120 days while the administration determines which countries pose the least risk.
  • Temporarily suspending visa issuances to people in countries where the administration considers security screening inadequate ― meaning people from those countries couldn't enter the U.S. at all.
  • Capping total refugee admissions for fiscal year 2017 at 50,000 ― less than half of the 110,000 proposed by the Obama administration.

Following David Muir's question about how Muslims might feel about the above expected order, Trump responded with: "There's plenty of anger right now. How can you have more?"


That's Bleak. Who's Fighting Against This?

The Council on American-Islamic Relations has opposed Trump's proposed restrictions. "These executive orders will not make our nation safer; rather they will signal to the world that America condones discriminatory religious based profiling in its immigration policies," said CAIR-NY Executive Director Afaf Nasher in a statement. "Our strength lies in our diversity, and our mission is to ensure justice for all New Yorkers."

Not Depressed Yet? Read the Full Saddest Calendar of the Year Here