Yep, There’s a Second QAnon Supporter Heading to Congress

Ahead of the election, a glut of QAnon candidates led some to fear a so-called “Qaucus” could take shape in Congress. 
November 4, 2020, 9:23pm
Lauren Boebert, the Republican candidate for the US House of Representatives seat in Colorado's 3rd Congressional District, addresses supporters during a campaign rally in Colona, Colorado on October 10, 2020.
Lauren Boebert, the Republican candidate for the US House of Representatives seat in Colorado's 3rd Congressional District, addresses supporters during a campaign rally in Colona, Colorado on October 10, 2020. (Photo by Jason Connolly / AFP) 

What’s worse than having one QAnon supporter in Congress? Having two QAnon supporters in Congress.

That’s right! As if 2020 couldn’t get any weirder, a second candidate who has openly espoused support for the baseless conspiracy theory that claims the Democratic elite are pedophilic cannibals is heading to Capitol Hill.

First-time Republican candidate Lauren Boebert defeated Democrat Diane Mitsch Bush in Colorado's 3rd Congressional District, according to AP. 

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Boebert will join Marjorie Taylor Greene, who won uncontested in Georgia’s 14th District on Tuesday. 

In July, Boebert, a political novice, won the Republican primary when she defeated Rep. Scott Tipton, a five-term Republican congressman who had been endorsed by President Donald Trump.

Trump, who repeatedly refused to disavow QAnon in recent months, quickly switched to supporting Boebert.

In May, Boebert appeared on the online radio show “Steel Truth,” hosted by QAnon supporter Ann Vandersteel, and said she was “very familiar with” QAnon. “It is only motivating and encouraging and bringing people together, stronger, and if this is real, then it could be really great for our country.”

She also appeared on Patriots' Soapbox, a major QAnon YouTube channel, and Media Matters for America, a progressive media watchdog, reported that Boebert’s own YouTube account subscribes to multiple QAnon channels.

But, just like Greene, as Election Day approached, Boebert attempted to downplay her support for QAnon. She released a statement calling herself “Congresswoman-elect,” and claiming: “The QAnon attacks were ridiculous. I have consistently said I am not a follower of and I do not believe in conspiracy theories.”

Boebert and Greene are two of 27 congressional candidates—25 Republicans, one member of the Independent Party of Delaware, and one independent—who had openly expressed support for QAnon. 

Ahead of the election, the glut of QAnon candidates led to fears that a so-called “Qaucus” could take shape in Congress. 

But Greene and Boebert are the only two who will win their races. The rest of the candidates have lost or are on course to lose—many of them after garnering less than 5 percent of the vote.

However, at state level, there have been a couple of victories for QAnon-supporting candidates. Mark Szuszkiewicz and Rob Chase have been elected to the New York State Assembly and the Washington State House of Representatives, respectively.