The New President of France Got Food-Shamed at a Highway Rest Stop

Apparently Macron's favorite food is only fit for children.
Alexis Ferenczi
Paris, France
Meredith Balkus
translated by Meredith Balkus
Brooklyn, United States
May 10, 2017, 8:00pm

A version of this article originally appeared on MUNCHIES France.

Forget the theory that he's somehow affiliated to the illuminati: Emmanuel Macron is a man just like any other. The proof, you ask? He really likes cordon bleu.

On Monday, May 8, TF1 released Les coulisses d'une victoire (Behind the Scenes of a Victory), a new documentary from Yann L'Henoret that covers Macron's presidential campaign. For eight months, the director followed the En Marche! candidate, sitting in on his rallies, travels, and meetings. It was an adventure punctuated by moments of glory and, occasionally, small disappointments.

Such as, for example, this "improvised" lunch in the Somme Bay area, at a fast food joint called Stratto along the A16 motorway. Plates are served on trays, cafeteria style, and L'Henoret's camera follows the same path as Macron along his journey of selecting a drink, a cold dish, and a hot dish, before capturing a fleeting moment of embarrassment that captivated the French internet.

"Tonight at 9:00PM, we offer you an exclusive documentary behind the scenes of Emmanuel Macron's victory. #Presidential2017"

WOMAN BEHIND COUNTER: "You were used to eating at L'Arche, perhaps?"

MACRON: "Yes, I knew this place back when it was it was L'Arche."

WOMAN BEHIND COUNTER: "It's changed."

MACRON: "It has, I see that."

WOMAN BEHIND COUNTER: "It's Stratto now."

MACRON: "It's nice. What's this? What should we order? I really like cordon-bleu."

WOMAN BEHIND COUNTER: "That's on the kid's menu."

MACRON: "Okay, I'll have the salmon instead."

Inevitably, the French had a field day with this. Some were pleased to learn what a candidate eats while campaigning, while others were happy to discover a new fast food option on the A16—and others were happy to learn they weren't the only ones forced to respect the laws set forth by a children's food menu.

"Dying at this Macron documentary, he asked for cordon bleu and the woman told him it's on the kid's menu."

When contacted by MUNCHIES, Pierre de Wulf, the co-founder of the Stratto chain, said he wants to be more flexible. "If you want cordon bleu, we're going to serve you [the portion from] the kid's menu. It's the same with President Macron. We would've served it to him, but the price would've been 6€ instead of 4.80€. I know he's young, but the menu is reserved for kids under 12 years old."