Mexico City's Rosa Pistola Brings Her Seductively Grimey Trap-Reggaeton Sound to New York

Catch her live as part of Trans-Pecos’ Mega City party series this weekend, that features exclusively Latin American artists.
February 3, 2017, 6:00pm

In advance of her first ever US appearance this weekend at Trans-Pecos, Mexico City-based DJ Rosa Pistola is sharing a hypnotic, body roll-inspiring trap and reggaeton mix that includes more than the occasional erotic moan amidst some slippery rhythms and up-tempo hooks. Originally hailing from Colombia, Pistola will play two shows in New York. Today, Feburary 3, she'll bring her talents to Trans-Pecos followed by a set at Babycastles in Manhattan on Saturday, alongside NYC-based DJs DJ Bebe and Ocar Nñ.

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On her Perreo Pa Ti / Perreo Pa Mi mix, Pistola pairs slippery, upbeat sounds with a slew of slower, dirtier beats that exude urban Latin America charm. She's here performing in the city as part of a new Latin American DJ party series called Mega City, which debuted on January 20 featuring art director Hector Llanquin and DJ's Zakmatic and Copout; dates planned through April will present additional artists like DJ Hotmale. Mexico City promoters and DJs, DUD, Saamaaanthaaaa, and Raymondstock will curate the entirety of the series. You can look out for Future Mega City announcements on their Instagram.

Below we chat with Rosa Pistola about the inspiration for her mix as well as the role of music in the Mexico-U.S. relationship, particularly now in the landscape of Trump's America.

In advance of her first ever US appearance this weekend at Trans-Pecos, Mexico City-based DJ Rosa Pistola is sharing a hypnotic, body roll-inspiring trap and reggaeton mix that includes more than the occasional erotic moan amidst some slippery rhythms and up-tempo hooks. Originally hailing from Colombia, Pistola will play two shows in New York. Today, Feburary 3, she'll bring her talents to Trans-Pecos followed by a set at Babycastles in Manhattan on Saturday, alongside NYC-based DJs DJ Bebe and Ocar Nñ.

On her Perreo Pa Ti / Perreo Pa Mi mix, Pistola pairs slippery, upbeat sounds with a slew of slower, dirtier beats that exude urban Latin America charm. She's here performing in the city as part of a new Latin American DJ party series called Mega City, which debuted on January 20 featuring art director Hector Llanquin and DJ's Zakmatic and Copout; dates planned through April will present additional artists like DJ Hotmale. Mexico City promoters and DJs, DUD, Saamaaanthaaaa, and Raymondstock will curate the entirety of the series. You can look out for Future Mega City announcements on their Instagram.

Below we chat with Rosa Pistola about the inspiration for her mix as well as the role of music in the Mexico-U.S. relationship, particularly now in the landscape of Trump's America.

THUMP: Tell us about the mix. What was your inspiration?

Rosa Pistola: When I do mixtapes I focus on sensuality and what I like to hear while making love.

Are the artists you included friends and collaborators from the Mexico-DF scene?
Well I always try to mix reggaeton pop with some underground, off-course tracks, as well as some productions from my friends. This mix has three Mexican songs: Diabla from De Las Hoes, these kids from Guadalajara, Seduceme from T.Ym and one remix Chico Sonido did of a track from my kids Los Xxxulo$.

Would this be typical of a night you'd play in a club at home?
No. When I'm doing my mixes at home I get a different mood —softer and sexier. Int he club I get very intense and the songs are nasty and faster and built for the dance floor.

Why did you decide to move from Colombia to Mexico City
Ufff I wasn't thinking but destiny randomly got me there and now I'm in love with this country. I wouldn't like to live anywhere else.

How do you think being an artist in Mexico differs from making music in the states?
The colors, the smells, the cuisine, the smog in D.F. The chaos and decay is all a daily inspiration.

What role does music have to play in Mexico-U.S. relations now that our wall-building, immigrant-fearing President is in power?
The music I play it's about union and sexual sensibility so in my inspiration there's no walls for the moment. I mean, I know the context about new world order, but I am trying to go faster than that phenomenon.

TRACKLIST:


Grab tickets to Mega City at Trans-Pecos and Babycastles

THUMP: Tell us about the mix. What was your inspiration?

Rosa Pistola: When I do mixtapes I focus on sensuality and what I like to hear while making love.

Are the artists you included friends and collaborators from the Mexico-DF scene?
Well I always try to mix reggaeton pop with some underground, off-course tracks, as well as some productions from my friends. This mix has three Mexican songs: Diabla from De Las Hoes, these kids from Guadalajara, Seduceme from T.Ym and one remix Chico Sonido did of a track from my kids Los Xxxulo$.

Would this be typical of a night you'd play in a club at home?
No. When I'm doing my mixes at home I get a different mood —softer and sexier. Int he club I get very intense and the songs are nasty and faster and built for the dance floor.

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Why did you decide to move from Colombia to Mexico City
Ufff I wasn't thinking but destiny randomly got me there and now I'm in love with this country. I wouldn't like to live anywhere else.

How do you think being an artist in Mexico differs from making music in the states?
The colors, the smells, the cuisine, the smog in D.F. The chaos and decay is all a daily inspiration.

What role does music have to play in Mexico-U.S. relations now that our wall-building, immigrant-fearing President is in power?
The music I play it's about union and sexual sensibility so in my inspiration there's no walls for the moment. I mean, I know the context about new world order, but I am trying to go faster than that phenomenon.

TRACKLIST:

Grab tickets to Mega City at Trans-Pecos and Babycastles