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Listen to Legendary Producer Arthur Baker in the Mix for THUMP

Half an hour of pure pleasure from a super producer.

Arthur Baker's not had a bad career. The Boston boy moved to New York in the late 80s and pretty much changed the face of popular music forever when he combined two Kraftwerk tracks and came back with Afrika Bambaataa and the Soul Sonic Force's "Planet Rock" — one of the most important hip hop records ever. In that same year, 1982, he produced Rockers Revenge's seminal "Walking on Sunshine" an electro-disco track that we're still rinsing out today.

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Baker went on to work with the likes of New Order, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, the Pet Shop Boys, and countless others. As a producer, he's unparalleled. So it's understandable that we were pretty stoked when he sent a mix our way. Stream it below.

Arthur Baker's not had a bad career. The Boston boy moved to New York in the late 80s and pretty much changed the face of popular music forever when he combined two Kraftwerk tracks and came back with Afrika Bambaataa and the Soul Sonic Force's "Planet Rock" — one of the most important hip hop records ever. In that same year, 1982, he produced Rockers Revenge's seminal "Walking on Sunshine" an electro-disco track that we're still rinsing out today.

Baker went on to work with the likes of New Order, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, the Pet Shop Boys, and countless others. As a producer, he's unparalleled. So it's understandable that we were pretty stoked when he sent a mix our way. Stream it below.

In an interview with DJ History conducted way back in 1999, Baker says that he thinks of himself as a failed DJ, adding, "Well, I was never really a DJ. Actually, I was probably one of the worst disc jockeys ever. No, I was. Because if I didn't get a good reaction on a record, I'd just rip it off, break it up and throw it on the dancefloor. And that was before I took drugs." He must have improved in the intervening years because the mix he's put together for us is a riotous romp through jump-up summer jams, warped warehouse belters and ecstatic disco. Baker's included the transcendental "No Price" by North End which he produced in 1981 and recently re-recorded with Chromeo and Al P. It's a perfect slice of feel good dancefloor fun.

If you're lucky enough to be at Sonar this month, you can catch Baker's documentary about the 808 drum machine. Head here for further information.

In an interview with DJ History conducted way back in 1999, Baker says that he thinks of himself as a failed DJ, adding, "Well, I was never really a DJ. Actually, I was probably one of the worst disc jockeys ever. No, I was. Because if I didn't get a good reaction on a record, I'd just rip it off, break it up and throw it on the dancefloor. And that was before I took drugs." He must have improved in the intervening years because the mix he's put together for us is a riotous romp through jump-up summer jams, warped warehouse belters and ecstatic disco. Baker's included the transcendental "No Price" by North End which he produced in 1981 and recently re-recorded with Chromeo and Al P. It's a perfect slice of feel good dancefloor fun.

If you're lucky enough to be at Sonar this month, you can catch Baker's documentary about the 808 drum machine. Head here for further information.