Hillary Clinton just got her first intelligence briefing as the Democratic nominee

Her campaign said the briefing went on for two hours and took place at the FBI offices in White Plains, north of New York City, near the Clinton's home in Westchester County.
August 27, 2016, 6:10pm
Hillary Clinton durante un discurso en el Parque Osceola Heritage. Florida, EEUU. 08 de agosto 2016. (Imagen por Cristobal Herrera/EPA)

Hillary Clinton got her first national security briefing as the official Democratic nominee — a process she is somewhat familiar with.

Her campaign said the briefing went on for two hours and took place at the FBI offices in White Plains, north of New York City, near the Clintons' home in Westchester County.

She was briefed alone by a "handful of officials" from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the Clinton campaign said.

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As President Barack Obama's Secretary of State, Clinton frequently handled sensitive intelligence documents containing classified information and analyses about the geopolitical climate.

Her use of a personal email server when handling potentially sensitive information has dogged her campaign, and furnished her Republican opponent with one of his favorite lines of attack.

Related: Clinton and Trump's intelligence briefings aren't that big of a deal

Last month, Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan wrote a letter to the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, arguing that the former secretary of state's use of a personal server — a decision which the FBI deemed "extremely reckless" — should effectively bar her from being privy to classified information. "I firmly believe this is necessary" Ryan wrote. "The consequences for our nation's safety are grave."

Clinton's first intelligence briefing as the official nominee isn't the only one that's been steeped in controversy.

Her opponent Donald Trump received his first briefing as the Republican nominee earlier this month. Prominent Democrats questioned whether the real-estate mogul could be trusted with such sensitive information, given his apparently unpredictable temper.

The intelligence briefings have been a traditional part of the race for the White House for the last 60 years and were introduced with the idea of making the handover between the incumbent and president-elect as smooth as possible.