Sex

Do Trendy ‘G-Spot Stimulating’ Creams and Gels Actually Work?

These products claim to make your G-spot more sensitive and easier to find. I decided to put a popular one to the test myself.
March 11, 2021, 8:21pm
Photo of woman pointing to a foil packet of G-spot gel
Photo by Tatyannah King

Now that it finally seems to be sinking in that the G-spot is an actual, real zone within the vagina’s internal clitoral framework, some companies are selling creams, gels, and lubricants that are supposedly designed to increase G-spot pleasure. When I first looked into Unbound’s O.M.G-Spot Stim Serum, Intimate Earth’s Discover G-spot Stimulating Serum and Pure Romance’s GPS G-spot Cream, I wondered if they could be meaningfully different from other “tingling” lubes, like the kind you see on the shelf at the drugstore—and, if so, how using them might actually feel. 

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I wanted to put the Unbound gel to the test, so I spoke with Staci Tanouye, a gynecologist and physician based in Jacksonville, Florida, to talk about how the ingredients in G-spot-stimulating products work. According to its packaging, O.M.G-Spot uses a blend of peppermint oil and arginine to “increase the size and sensitivity of the G-spot, making it easier to find.” Tanouye clarified the effects of the peppermint oil in Unbound’s product: “The primary active ingredient in most of these types of creams is menthol, which can cause a tingling sensation on the skin,” Tanouye explained. She said that while menthol wasn’t likely to cause long-term harm, it might have irritating side effects, like a burning sensation, for some people when used internally. 

Caroline West, a sex writer, professor, and researcher, said that “tingling” products, including G-spot gels and creams like the Unbound serum, contain arginine, an organic compound that changes into a neurotransmitter inside the body, because it “makes blood vessels dilate and, hence, allows for increased blood circulation,” West said. (If you have herpes, West said, using arginine internally “can result in an outbreak,” since it has viral growth properties.)

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In terms of whether G-spot creams and gels are good to use with condoms and sex toys, Tanouye said that their compatibility ultimately depends on their base. If they’re oil-based, they’re not safe with condoms because they increase the risk of breakage. If they’re silicone-based, they’re not recommended for use with silicone toys because they’ll damage the material. As with lube in general: Water-based creams and gels are the all-around most versatile option.

Although I understood that there was some risk of irritation, as there would be with any lube or gel containing menthol, I was still curious enough to try out Unbound’s O.M.G-Spot. The product is a vegan, water-based serum that comes in a little foil packet meant for one-time use, which I thought was convenient in case I wanted to stash it in my purse on the way to a future dick appointment. 

When I tried the gel, I picked one of my go-to porn videos to turn myself on, since that makes the G-spot fill with blood and easier to find. I laid on my back, propped a pillow underneath my pelvis so I was in a position that allowed me easier access to my G-spot, and started touching myself. When I was into it and ready, I squeezed some serum from its foil packet on the tip of my fingers—enough to cover the last joint of my finger, the area you use to give a digital fingerprint—and maneuvered them inside my vagina with a “come hither” motion toward the direction of my belly button.

I didn’t feel any immediate difference. I figured the gel may have needed a minute or two to work whatever its magic was, so I took a minute to find another porn video and switch from my fingers to a toy. I rubbed a little of the serum on a curved G-spot vibrator and put it inside me, and suddenly, I could feel a slight tingle—similar to how you’d feel a bit of a tingle while brushing their teeth with minty toothpaste. It was easier to locate the ribbed, textured area of my G-spot with a toy, and, with the serum, it felt like my G-spot had a spongier texture than usual, which was easier for me to handle, stimulation-wise: Normally, whenever I touch my G-spot, touching it feels rougher and almost too intense to take. 

While the Unbound gel didn’t necessarily make my orgasm any more intense than it normally is, the serum stimulated my G-spot in ways that helped me enjoy prolonged attention to it, which I really liked. In general, gel also made every ridge and curve of my vagina that it came in contact with more sensitive. Though it wasn't irritating to me this time, that might not be the case for everybody—if you’re especially sensitive, you might just want to stick to water-based lubes without menthol in them. Overall, I found the gel gave a nice extra boost to regular penetration, and I’m looking forward to testing it out again during sex with my partner—all in the name of research, of course. 

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