The VICE Guide to Right Now

Amusement Park Opens Ferris Wheel for Remote Working

Giving a whole new meaning to “an office with a view.”
Matt Selvam
Singapore
October 13, 2020, 7:54am
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Photo: Courtesy of Yomiuriland, PR Times

Jobs are looking very different in 2020. With the rise of telecommuting due to the pandemic, more people are now working from home or in former holiday spots offering ‘workation’ packages. Some work on beaches, others in mountains. And now, people can do the same while up in the air, on a Ferris wheel.

Yomiuriland, one of the biggest amusement parks in Japan, will be launching an “amusement workation” package, which allows visitors to work remotely within the park. This includes up to one hour on a Ferris wheel gondola-turned-private workspace. Those who want to check tasks off their to-do list while surrounded by clouds can do so using a pocket Wi-Fi the park provides.

Meanwhile, those who prefer to stay earth-bound can work in poolside “work booths” that come with tables, deck chairs, Wi-Fi, and outlets.

The package will be available starting Thursday, for the price of 1,900 yen ($18) for one person and 3,600 yen ($34) for a pair, inclusive of free parking.

The amusement park’s other attractions are also open throughout the day, including a rollercoaster, laser tag, haunted house, and go-karts. But an activity-filled lunch break will come at an extra cost, as these attractions are not part of the workation package.

Workation packages have become popular as the tourism industry continues to decline due to the pandemic. One Maldives resort launched a $23,000 workation package in September, which includes an ocean view, a personal assistant, free-flowing drinks, and complimentary laundry service.

Meanwhile, Singapore Airlines, the country’s flag carrier, is now offering a first-class dining experience onboard the world’s largest passenger aircraft with prices for seats ranging from SG$50 ($37) to SG$600 ($442).

In Japan, the government plans to turn several national parks into workstation-friendly locations, complete with work stations and projectors.

As of writing, Japan had a total of 89,674 COVID-19 cases and 1,631 deaths.