FYI.

This story is over 5 years old.

Psychedelic Photomicrography and the Silicon Zoo

Michael Davidson, who heads the "Industrial Photomicrography department":http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/micro/about.html at the FSU site of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, makes his living taking pictures of teeny tiny living and non-living...
November 30, 2010, 2:53pm

Michael Davidson, who heads the Industrial Photomicrography department at the FSU site of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, makes his living taking pictures of teeny tiny living and non-living cells through a high-powered microscope.

OO.ready(function() { OO.Player.create('ooyalaplayer', 'xyNWQxMjraIig9KcDzmnuGZMVKhn1F-i'); });

Please enable Javascript to watch this video

Simply as a result of the slide stains needed for the different parts of the cell to show up through the lens, even the most rudimentary of cellular processes turn into psychedelic visuals the likes of which Hunter S. Thompson could never have imagined. Davidson has taken his eye for microscopic aesthetics to the corporate world, photographing the crystalization of a wide variety of beers and pharmaceuticals for use in advertisements, screensavers, and, like all things psychedelic, a line of neck-ties.

Davidson is also the discoverer and curator of the “Silicon Zoo,” a collection of infinitesimal drawings etched directly into the circuitry of mass-manufactured microprocessors by their designers, and running the gamut in shape and style from a 2mm-long Crayola crayon to a Waldo one-third the width of a human hair. It’s like tiny graffiti for nerds (regular nerds, not graffiti nerds).