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Filipinos Get Creative With Coronavirus-Inspired Baby Names

"Hello, my name is Covid Lorraine."
23 March 2020, 10:17am
baby name philippines coronavirus covid bryant
For illustrative purposes only. Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Filipinos never miss the chance for a good pun. And the best ones are those that last a lifetime. Like, you know, baby names. In the past, overly creative Filipino parents named their newborns after typhoons and public holidays. In 2018, parents named their kids after Philippine candidate Catriona Gray, who won Miss Universe that year. But with the coronavirus taking over headlines this year, there’s a new baby trend in motion.

Viral on Philippine social media at the moment are some pretty outlandish names inspired by the pandemic.

Twitter user Niña Cayosa claimed that she heard about a woman who gave birth on March 15, the start of Metro Manila’s lockdown, and supposedly named her baby — wait for it — Covid Bryant.

Given Filipinos’ obsession with basketball and the late Los Angeles Lakers star, this is not at all shocking. However, the post didn't actually include an official birth certificate.

Still, it seems netizens can’t deal with the bizarre combination and can only cope with their own quips and memes.

Netizens talked about the name thousands of times on different social media platforms. Now, more people are sharing other COVID-19-inspired baby names.

GMA News reported that a baby girl was named Covid Lorraine in Magpet, Cotabato, while another one in Isulan, Sultan Kudarat was supposedly registered as Covid Rose. Although this has not been verified, people also find it hilarious that a baby was supposedly named the tongue twister Coviduvidapdap.

The trend even inspired others to share their own creative baby name suggestions. Here's a slightly different one that’s still in theme and fit for film lovers.

Whether they're real names or just part of an elaborate meme, the social media trend is a much-needed comic relief for many Filipinos. After Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte placed the Philippines’ largest island Luzon under a strict community quarantine — suspending work, school, and public transport — many provinces outside the island followed suit. While most people want to stay home, many of those in lower-income communities are suffering from the loss of income. As of writing, there are 462 cases, 33 deaths, and 18 recoveries in the Philippines.