Advertisement
VFX Art

A Russian VFX Artist Added Explosions to Classic GIFs

Self-taught artist Patiffonka remixes GIFs with the firepower of Micheal Bay (and the bodily fluids of Rick and Morty).

by Beckett Mufson
12 May 2017, 12:12am

This article contains graphic content.

Somehow both charming and vile, Moscow-based animator Patiffonka's VFX-addled GIFs transform the schadenfreude of viral fail GIFs into sci-fi action movie absurdities.

A shimmy-slip-to-the-floor escalates quickly when the dancer dissolves into a pool of gelatinous goop. A playing panda dodges bullets in a make-believe war zone. A botched parkour stunt ends with a splatter, followed by a video game skeleton dropping a cartoonish cherry bomb. " I want to surprise the audience with something unusual," Patiffonka tells Creators. "My favorite comments are, 'What did I just watch?' and, 'Enough internet for today.'"

Patiffonka started his come-up five years ago, killing time outside his day job as a 3D game animator to remix friends' GIF suggestions. He spends anywhere from an hour to a week on a single loop, using free demo software and posting the results on Russian social media sites like VK and Pikabu. "Creating funny videos—this is my hobby, and it does not bring me material profit," he explains. "I do this only for my own pleasure. All my publications are on free platforms, where as a reward I get only pluses and positive comments."

One day Patiffonka hopes to turn his sharpened skill set towards a larger narrative than fits in a three-second clip. "I have been dreaming about creating short film for a long time," he says. "I even have a few scenarios that I like. But this, unfortunately, requires a lot of time and effort. I hope in the near future I will be able to do this."

Check out his alien imaginings in the videos below:

See more of Patiffonka's work here.

Related:

Watch A Dreamworks Animator Turn His Son Into A Superhero With DIY Special Effects

Sarcastic Comics Serve Up Moments When Life Just Perfectly Sucks

Lil Dicky Made an 11-Minute Video and We Don't Hate It