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Pops of Rainbow Color on Metal and Wood Sculptures Spin a Tale of Environmental Exploitation

Conceptual artist Arne Quinze interprets mankind’s ecological destruction.

by Diana Shi
05 February 2017, 12:40pm

Images courtesy the artist and DENK Gallery, Los Angeles

A tangled mass of neon saturation populates a gallery space, aiming to bring attention to the hapless consequences of human waste and environmental exploitation. Situated inside DENK gallery in LA, Arne Quinze’s massive installation and 3D wall hangings in the exhibit Jungle Cities tell a narrative that is part chaotic tale of consequence, part lesson for the human race. The Belgian-born Quinze has a penchant for applying pops of searingly bright color to wood and metal in order to start a dialogue on the natural world, as well as establishing a distinct aesthetic voice.

DENK gallery, which houses Quinze's latest show, is directed by David Hoey and Dr. Katja Van Herle. Together, the endocrinologist and architecture-learned aesthete, respectively, strive to bring attention to new artists as well as focus on the health benefits of viewing art.   

Quinze, a conceptual artist who often constructs oversized installations splashed with chroma, has consistently focused on forming interesting new versions of familiar day-to-day structures. He favors building community places as a means to examine human relations and their impact on the natural surroundings.

“In this day and age,” the artist shares with The Creators Project. “We can see clearly for the first time, the impact man has had on the natural world. I was shocked to learn that since I was born in 1971, we, as humans, have managed to destroy one-third of the flora and fauna existing at that time.”

As an artist, Quinze shrewdly considers his responsibility to provoke a conversation with his work, reviving and unearthing issues that remain forgotten or unftouched by the mainstream media. He shares that by exercising his “duty to use [his] public art to call for a better balance between culture and nature,” he hopes to encourage the public to take action through awareness, especially in an “urban planning context.”

Jungle Cities shows at DENK gallery in Downtown Los Angeles now through April 15th. To learn more about the show, visit the exhibit’s page, here.

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