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Trump's Proposed Budget Cuts Will Go After the Arts

His plan reportedly wants to privatize the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and cut the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for Humanities entirely.

by Lauren Messman
Jan 19 2017, 5:48pm

Photo via Gage Skidmore

According to the Hill, Trump's transition team has reportedly drawn up a budget plan to reduce the federal spending by $10.5 trillion over the next ten years by slashing numerous government programs and funding.

Among them include major cuts to the State, Justice, and Transportation departments, as well as reduced funding for the departments of Commerce and Energy. The transition also apparently wants to privatize the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and axe the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for Humanities.

Although we won't know the specifics of the plan until its introduced after Trump's inauguration, it appears to closely emulate a similar budget plan proposed by conservative think tank, the Heritage Foundation. The architects of Trump's budget plan, Russ Vought and John Gray, used to work for the Heritage Foundation. They also both worked under incoming VP Mike Pence.

"The Trump Administration needs to reform and cut spending dramatically," Heritage staffer Brian Darling told the Hill. "And targeting waste like the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities would be a good first step in showing that the Trump Administration is serious about radically reforming the federal budget."

The Heritage plan calls for cutting things like the Department of Justice's Violence Against Women Grants and reducing its Civil Rights and Environment and Natural Resources programs. It also outlines cuts in funding to programs within the Department of Energy that focus on renewable energy and reducing carbon emissions. Additionally, the Heritage blueprint suggests gutting funding for the Paris Climate Change Agreement and the UN's panel on climate change.

The full 200-page plan probably won't be released until around April, but the preliminary plans will be sent of to the heads of various federal departments and agencies soon after Trump is sworn in. Depending on which departments cause the most uproar, we'll likely know where the administration's priorities lie for the next four years.