The Toxic Online Culture of AI-Assisted Porn

Deepfakes were created as a way to own women's bodies.

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Jul 13 2018, 5:24pm

Image: Jacqueline Lin

When Reddit user Deepfakes created his first AI-generated porn videos, he had no idea that the ripple effects would shut down an entire community.

His machine learning technique, which he shared in a subreddit, allowed people to paste faces on existing porn videos, thus faking who was in the scene. At first, this bred a slew of porn videos with celebrity faces on them—Jessica Alba, for example, was one of the original victims. Then it became more dangerous. Reddit users started sharing creations that included their high school girlfriends, or other private citizens who had no idea their likeness had been copy-pasted into a porno.

After Motherboard's Samantha Cole broke the story and explored the community, Reddit eventually shut down the subreddit forum altogether. But that hardly means the issue is put to rest. On today's episode of The VICE Guide to Right Now podcast, Cole discusses the risk and role of Deepfakes and the impact this debacle has had on women online from her story in VICE magazine's Privacy and Perception issue.

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This article originally appeared on VICE US.

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