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Trump jokes that Elizabeth Warren should do campaign commercial where U.S. massacred Sioux women and children

"If Elizabeth Warren, often referred to by me as Pocahontas, did this commercial from Bighorn or Wounded Knee instead of her kitchen, with her husband dressed in full Indian garb, it would have been a smash!” the president tweeted.

by Rex Santus
Jan 14 2019, 3:42pm

President Donald Trump has resorted to more racist jokes to attack 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, the progressive senator from Massachusetts.

Warren, who has faced blowback for her decision to release a DNA test to prove she had Native American heritage, is among the first Democrats to publicly announce that she’s pursuing a presidential bid.

“If Elizabeth Warren, often referred to by me as Pocahontas, did this commercial from Bighorn or Wounded Knee instead of her kitchen, with her husband dressed in full Indian garb, it would have been a smash!” Trump tweeted Sunday night in reference to an Instagram Live video Warren filmed from her kitchen drinking a beer with her husband.

Wounded Knee is most famous as the site where U.S. soldiers massacred as many as 300 Sioux people, including women and children, in 1890. About a hundred years later in the ‘90s, Congress passed a resolution to issue a “long-awaited apology” for the brutal incident.

Historians, journalists, and Native Americans responded to Trump’s latest jab at Warren with forceful condemnation.

“+300 of my people were massacred at Wounded Knee. Most were women and children,” tweeted Ruth H. Hopkins, a Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer. “This isn’t funny, it’s cold, callous, and just plain racist.”

Trump has repeatedly targeted Warren with attacks of her decades-old claim that she had Native American ancestry. He once promised to pay $1 million to a charity of Warren’s choice if she took a DNA test, which she did, though Trump never completed the donation.

Cover image: President Donald Trump talks with reporters on the South Lawn of the White House before departing for the American Farm Bureau Federation's 100th Annual Convention in New Orleans, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

This article originally appeared on VICE News US.