Art

Semiconductor's New Installation Is a Portal into the Cosmos

'Catching the Light' at the ArtScience Museum in Singapore features projected timelapses of raw deep space data.

by Becky Chung
24 March 2015, 1:30pm

Catching the Light, 2014, multi-channel HD moving image with 6 metre wide Alucore screens. Images courtesy the artists. 

Portholes peek out into deep space in Semiconductor’s recent multi-channel moving image installation, Catching the Light. At the ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore for the ongoing Da Vinci: Shaping the Future exhibition, the art duo stitched together raw visual data from space telescopes into timelapses, and projected their stellar collages onto a wall to “remap the sky.” 

“We wanted to work with space telescope data which [are] the most well known doctored images in that images such as those we see from the Hubble Space Telescope have been highly processed, colorized, layered etc. far removed from the raw images that have been captured,” the duo tells The Creators Project. The original visuals contain glimpses of the technologies used to capture them, such as the rotation of the telescope, they add. This helps to shape the frames in which the stars live within the installation.

“We embrace all these artifacts as a way to remind us of man as an observer of space and to also represent these images in a new way, and to question what have they become now, what to they tell us, how do we read them?” they ask. For an upcoming, single-channel cinematic version that they are currently fundraising, Semiconductor plans to use more data from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). See video of the installation here, and check out their brilliant still images below.

Catching the Light, 2014, multi-channel HD moving image with 6 metre wide Alucore screens.

Catching the Light, 2014, multi-channel HD moving image with 6 metre wide Alucore screens.

Catching the Light, 2014, multi-channel HD moving image with 6 metre wide Alucore screens.

Catching the Light is currently on display as part of the Da Vinci: Shaping the Future exhibition at ArtScience Museum at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. Book your tickets here

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