Advertisement
The British Dream

How Politics Shaped Grime and Grime Shaped Politics

We spoke to Dan Hancox, author of 'Inner City Pressure: The Story of Grime' how Grime beat yuppies, politicians and the police to go stratospheric.

by Simon Childs
29 June 2018, 12:56pm

Stormzy performing in 2017 (WENN Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo)

Grime has gone from a music genre that the police tried to snuff out, to one of Britain’s most in demand cultural exports, all the while maintaining its anti-establishment edge.

For this episode of The British Dream we spoke to Dan Hancox, author of Inner City Pressure: The Story of Grime, about why the genre sounds like a riot that's about to happen, its adversarial relationship with the state and its roots in a London taken over by luxury flats and privatised public space. We also chatted about the moral panic currently surrounding drill and knife crime, and asked whether violent music leads to violence.

Inner City Pressure: The Story of Grime is out now on William Collins