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Trial Told That a Policeman Was Found Hoarding £700,000 of Seized Drugs in His Home

Keith Boots, 55, kept coke, crack and heroin in his washing machine.

by Joe Bish
19 January 2017, 11:07am

(Top photo: washing machine, not involved in this case, via pixabay; cocaine photo by Zxc, via)

Where did you hide your drugs when you were a nipper? Your bedside table is a safe bet if there's enough stuff in there and you don't have a mother who will routinely sift through its entire contents while you're at school like a weed baggy minesweeper. Or you could get a bit old-timey and cut a hole into a shit book and stick it in there. Or maybe hiding it in plain sight is best – stick it in your pocket and hope you don't get stopped and searched.

Tell you who should have hidden his drugs better: former police inspector Keith Boots, of Halifax. The 55-year-old, who was responsible for disposing of drugs seized in raids, was found keeping an estimated £700,000 worth of cocaine, crack, heroin, weed, pills and live ammunition in his house, which he is alleged to have stolen from police stores. Leeds Crown Court heard the narcotics were hidden in his washing machine, his fireplace and his fridge, so we can assume that he either lived alone, with a moll or with a wife who is trusting and blind. 

The court heard that Boots' home was raided in December of 2014. "What was found on the ground floor would have kept a 1970s rock star and his band entertained for weeks," quipped Prosecutor Paul Greaney QC. "In a gross breach of trust, he had been exploiting weaknesses in the system for the destruction of controlled drugs in order to steal them," he then said, getting a little more serious. 

Boots – who is on trial with his son, Ashley, and a third defendant, Ian Mitchell – denies theft, possession of controlled drugs with intent to supply, possessing ammunition, conspiracy to supply controlled drugs, conspiracy to steal and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

Ashley Boots, 29, denies possession of controlled drugs with intent to supply, possessing ammunition, conspiracy to supply controlled drugs, conspiracy to steal and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

Ian Mitchell, 27, denies conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

The trial continues. 

@joe_bish

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