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[Behind the Scenes] Love Is a First-Person Shooter in Darwin Deez's New Music Video

Video game logic solves domestic disputes like dirty dishes and long showers in director Dent de Cuir's FPS-based story.

by Beckett Mufson
06 July 2015, 4:15pm

Images courtesy Ruffian

Dating a video game character is tough in director Dent de Cuir's first-person shooter music video for "Kill Your Attitude" by Darwin Deez. Leaving dishes in the sink, using up all the hot shower water, and not doing chores become capital crimes, rather than just cause for domestic spats, as the character calls in SWAT teams, tanks, and whips out her own assault rifles in reaction to Darwin's less-than-empathetic behavior. “We thought it was interesting to design an FPS video game and use it as a narrative canvas to speak about little wars which occur during the lifespan of a relationship," de Cuir tells Leap Motion.

To make the video, de Cuir worked with Leap Motion and VFX studio Ruffian Post to build most of a video game in the Unity engine. To make the super relatable first-person sequences, they used a Leap Motion hack—similar to Isaac Cohen's synesthesia-inducing Rainbow Membraneto let an actor move the gun around like a person. "By using the Leap Motion platform, the team didn't need to hand-animate every first-person hand," Leap Motion communications director Eva Babiak tells The Creators Project. "This saved time and resources on the animation work, allowing the team to include more of those hand shots."

Watch the music video above, and check out some behind-the-scenes images of the Leap Motion setup below:

Screencap via

Read more on the Leap Motion blog, hear more Darwin Deez here, and see more of Dent de Cuir's work on his website.

Related:

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Tagged:
music video
Video Games
Darwin Deez
Unity
Dent de Cuir
motion capture
FPS
leap motion
ruffian post production