Culture

Artists Share Home Videos and Family Photos in a New Exhibit

'I Remember Not Remembering' brings together 12 narratives from 12 international artists to find a pattern to the practice of memory-making.
13 December 2016, 6:00pm
Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d., 2014. Two-channel film work with audio, HD digital; running time: 15 minutes 26 seconds. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Home movies and family photos chronicle stories that parallel the histories of places and cultural moments. These are private records that, for the most part, remain private. I Remember Not Remembering, a group show opening in February 2017 at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, breaks this mold, making public the private histories of 12 international artists.

In doing so, the show reveals commonalities between individual practices in memory-making. Three lounging ladies on a sun-soaked pier could be your three favorite aunties in their glamor days; a still of a pep rally brings back traumatic memories of faking fanaticism on game day; and a little boy stumbling through a hula-hoop might as well be a younger you. But these memories are not yours: they belong to artist Yto Barrada, whose scenes tell a subtle story of sociality in post-Colonial Morocco; and to filmmaker Kahlil Joseph, who captures the zeitgeist of Los Angeles at the time of the race riots; and to artist Larry Sultan, whose movie stills detail daily life in 1960s suburban America.

“Together,” the show’s press release describes, “we assemble a shared history that resides in memory, desire, and imagery—a narrative both subjective and communal.”

Below, meet the ghosts of the pasts of Barrada, Joseph, and Sultan, as well as of Hollis Frampton, Christian Boltanski, Adriana Trujillo, José Inerzia, Matthew Buckingham, Janet Cardiff, George Bures Miller, Christian Widmer, and Hannah Wilke.

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Yto Barrada, Hand-Me Downs, 2011. 16mm and 8mm film transferred to single-channel color digital video with sound, 5:4 format, running time: 15 minutes. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery, London; Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg, Beirut; and Galerie Polaris, Paris. © Yto Barrada

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Larry Sultan, detail, Untitled Home Movie Stills, 1984–91, from the series “Pictures From Home,” 1992. Forty-four inkjet prints transferred from 16mm film. Each 17 x 22 inches. Collection of the Estate of Larry Sultan

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Larry Sultan, detail, Untitled Home Movie Stills, 1984–91, from the series “Pictures From Home,” 1992. Forty-four inkjet prints transferred from 16mm film. Each 17 x 22 inches. Collection of the Estate of Larry Sultan

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d., 2014. Two-channel film work with audio, HD digital; running time: 15 minutes 26 seconds. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d., 2014. Two-channel film work with audio, HD digital; running time: 15 minutes 26 seconds. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d., 2014. Two-channel film work with audio, HD digital; running time: 15 minutes 26 seconds. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

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Hollis Frampton, still from (nostalgia), 1971 from “Hapax Legomena I,” 1971. Projection of digitized single channel black-and-white 16mm film with sound, running time: 36 minutes. Courtesy of the Estate of Hollis Frampton and Anthology Film Archives, New York

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Matthew Buckingham, Situation Leading to a Story, 1999. Single channel black-and-white 16mm film projection with sound, running time: 21 minutes, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © the artist

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Matthew Buckingham, Situation Leading to a Story, 1999. Single channel black-and-white 16mm film projection with sound, running time: 21 minutes, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © the artist

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Adriana Trujillo and José Inerzia, still, Skin Destination, 2012. Single-channel color digital video projection with sound and English subtitles, running time: 10 minutes. Courtesy of the artists

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Adriana Trujillo and José Inerzia, still, Skin Destination, 2012. Single-channel color digital video projection with sound and English subtitles, running time: 10 minutes. Courtesy of the artists

I Remember Not Remembering opens February 11, 2017 at SMoCA. To find more information about the show, visit the museum's website.

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