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Turns Out Women Like POV Porn Just as Much as Men

"Men and women are looking for virtually the same thing, but each is looking for themselves to be the centerpiece."

This article originally appeared on VICE Australia. 

When it comes to making porn for women, mainstream adult entertainment studios have tried a lot: more romance, more kissing, prettier decor, softer lighting, silk sheets—you name it. But as an increasing number of companies are discovering, a lot of women like hardcore porn just as much as men. They just like it from a different perspective.

That's where producers of virtual reality porn hope to step in and plug the gap. Take WankzVR, a VR porn site launched last year that has released four new videos shot from the physical point of view, or POV, of a woman. POV porn was already a hugely popular subgenre of porn—a quick search online throws up video after video—but unsurprisingly, it is most often filmed from the physical point of view of a man.

In WankzVR's videos, however, the viewer/porn actress become "one"; in this case on her back as she has sex with another performer (or two). Users can download the videos for viewing on smartphones or on VR headsets, including the Oculus Rift or Samsung Gear VR.

WankzVR isn't the only company who has begun to experiment with female POV porn in VR: VirtualRealPorn features a mix of lesbian and heterosexual porn also shot this way—although it does require viewers to pay. There are also plenty of niche sites that have long been producing content by and for women. But female POV efforts by VR porn sites represent an evolution in the way mainstream adult filmmakers view content for women.

"Our general mentality several years ago was, if we wanted to make couples-friendly adult content for women, we'd take a lot of the intensity out of the scene," says Bradley Phillips, managing director of Amsterdam-based Pimproll, which operates nearly 1,000 websites, including WankzVR. "We'd tone down the level of a lot of the action, add in a lot more kissing."

In recent years, however, "when our female users started openly giving us a lot of feedback, they said 'That's really not what we're looking for,'" Phillips says. "Men and women are looking for virtually the same thing, but each is looking for themselves to be the centerpiece of the content."

Read the rest at Broadly