The Rise of the Streetwear Pussy Posse

New York is their Disneyland, but instead of skipping the line at nightclubs, Jonah Hill, Justin Theroux and others are skipping the line at Supreme.

|
23 April 2018, 4:30pm

Last autumn, a new set of style muses began to capture the imagination of the celebrity gossip machine. "Feeling the Jonah Chill?" read a headline on the Daily Mail in late December. "Nothing was stopping Jonah Hill from getting his newly toned legs out as he enjoyed a sport of Christmas shopping in the big Apple."

Hill was carrying a white Supreme shopping bag, and the Mail pointed out his "dove gray fitted coat, paired with a red hoodie", his "navy baseball cap" (which read "Jerry Garcia", AKA the deceased leader of the official cult band of menswear), and his "black plimsoll shoes and matching socks" (an Adidas sock sneaker – currently on the feet of nearly every employee at Dover Street Market).

This kind of coverage has become a tabloid habit: Hill hits the streets, and his outfit makes it news. Writing in the breathless style that makes outfit descriptions sound like phone sex murmurs, the Daily Mail wrote in January of his sweater, by the British skateboarding brand Palace: "He sported an electric blue T-shirt underneath [h]is warm jacket, with black-and-white writing outlined in vibrant stripes."

In late March, the Mail praised his "black and white colour block sweater" and "monochrome theme"; earlier this month, they congratulated him for "his striking new hairdo" (a buzzcut) and "[keeping] his look ultra casual in sport black shorts". (Not everyone is a fan: the British men’s site LadBible called a coat Hill wore in mid-April for an outing with Michael Cera "one hell of an ugly coat" but said Cera "looked slightly cooler".)

Hill is an established menswear icon: he is the subject of an Instagram "fit watch" à la Shia LeBeouf, and the hosts of the menswear podcast Failing Upwards even hosted a Jonah Hill Day party in Williamsburg during fashion week last September. But suddenly, the brands and trends that seemed to appeal to a niche set are getting a major tabloid cosign.

Read the rest of this story on Garage.