Private Immigration Detention Centers Aren't Going Anywhere

The Department of Homeland Security is expected to report that it will continue its widespread use of the private facilities, despite their high cost to run and human rights concerns.

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Dec 1 2016, 6:25pm
After a two-month review, the Department of Homeland Security is expected to report Thursday that it will continue its widespread use of private immigration detention centers to house people who are under criminal investigation, waiting to get deported, or under consideration for asylum, according to the Washington Post.

After the Department of Justice announced it would rollback its use of private prisons in August, citing their safety shortcomings, an advisory council decided to take a look at the Department of Homeland Security's use of private facilities where roughly 65 percent of the country's immigrant detainees are housed.

The advisory council reportedly decided that immigration officials should continue to use the facilities, despite the high cost to run them and numerous human rights concerns, in order to "respond to surges in migration flows."

Private immigration centers would likely be a fixture of Donald Trump's mass deportation platform, as it's where the majority of immigrants would go to wait for a flight home. Since the election, the stock price for the two major companies that run the country's private detention centers jumped to more than 35 percent.

Watch: The Real Cost of Donald Trump's Immigration Plans

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