Tech by VICE

Dating App Loveflutter Thinks Your Tweets Are the Key to True Love

Love me Twitter, love me true.

by Meaghan Beatley
Jun 20 2017, 3:30pm

Image: Jocelyn/Flickr

Forget about the eyes: your tweets are the window to your soul. Or at least that's what dating app Loveflutter purports in its bid to get you laid in 140 characters or less.

Originally founded in 2013, London-based Loveflutter was relaunched in May this year after formally partnering up with Twitter. Much like Tinder or Bumble, users can anonymously swipe left or right on candidates using the interface, except the onus isn't on their pictures (blurred until you click on them) but on their 10 latest tweets.

"Tweets show the real you," cofounder Daigo Smith told Motherboard. "They're more spontaneous than Instagram posts and show your witty and humorous side too."

Smith explained the idea first came to him after reading material by language scientist James Pennebaker—a professor at Texas University; the cofounder of Receptiviti, a text analysis AI platform; and the author of The Secret Life of Pronouns—claiming that there is a direct relationship between tweets and users' personalities. In fact, Smith partnered up with Receptiviti to develop Analyze140, a personality test that not only cranks out psychological profiles for Twitter users but also gives you advice on how to best chat them up.

An analysis of @realDonalTrump's tweet

Pennebaker did not respond to our request for comment.

Although Analyze140 is currently separate from the dating app, Smith has big plans to combine the two.

"By the end of 2017, we'll be implementing an LSM [Language Style Matching] compatibility score which shows strength of compatibility based on your writing styles, first up comparing your tweets to another person's tweets (a pre-match LSM compatibility score) and then after you've matched and started to chat comparing your writing styles in messaging (post-match LSM compatibility score)," Smith explained.

"I guess it might encourage me to beef up my Twitter game a little."

"We're even hoping to suggest the best time to suggest a date (i.e. when your compatibility score is highest), an exciting area bringing AI into the dating equation," he added.

For those of us with the emotional tweeting capacity of a napkin dispenser, Loveflutter may not be the best way to score.

"I think those that use their Twitter account for purely work purposes might not be best suited to connecting their Twitter account to Loveflutter," Smith agreed. That's why the app now allows users to create accounts via email or Facebook and make up a set of tweets on the spot.

But for others like Jordan Landsman, a stand-up comedian from New York who frequently takes to Twitter to hone his trade, the app might just be a goldmine.

"Of course I would use it," he told Motherboard. "I guess it might encourage me to beef up my Twitter game a little."

Still, he wasn't completely convinced by the app's bid for greater authenticity.

"It's like they've developed a way to delay feeling shallow by 15 seconds," Landsman said. "They should make an app where you can see the other person's dental records. I want a girl who flosses regularly."