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Former Guantanamo Inmate Omar Khadr's Bail Conditions Relaxed So He Can Travel

An Alberta judge granted Khadr permission to travel to Toronto to visit family and take off his electronic monitoring bracelet. He also no longer has to use surveillance software on his computer.

by VICE News
Sep 18 2015, 6:50pm

Nathan Denette/Canadian Press

Bail conditions for former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr have been eased yet again.

On Friday morning, a judge in Edmonton, Alberta granted Khadr permission to travel to Toronto to visit family and take off his electronic monitoring bracelet. He also no longer has to use surveillance software on his computer.

After 13 years in custody, Khadr, 29, was released from an Edmonton prison on $5,000 bail in May pending his appeal of his controversial conviction for war crimes by a military tribunal in the US. In 2002, Khadr, then 15, was captured by the US military in Afghanistan and imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay where he confessed in 2010, under torture, to tossing a grenade that killed one soldier and injured another. Two years later he was transferred to an Edmonton prison.

His original bail conditions included living with his lawyer in Edmonton, observing a curfew, wearing an ankle monitor, and seeking permission from a supervisor in order to visit with his family.

Earlier this month, Khadr appealed to the court to have those conditions relaxed, saying they were unnecessary. "My release and reintegration into the community have been going great," Khadr wrote in his application. "I have not gotten into any trouble of any kind with the authorities."

He also said he ankle bracelet was embarrassing and uncomfortable.

Related: Former Guantanamo Bay Prisoner Omar Khadr Wants His Bail Conditions Eased

The judge ruled last week at his hearing that his curfew could be adjusted to allow him to attend early morning prayers and night classes.

According to the Canadian Press, Khadr wants to visit Toronto for two weeks soon to visit his family.

The Conservative government has yet to comment on the court's move to give Khadr more freedom, but has said it would appeal Khadr's bail and has condemned Khadr's attempts to "lessen his punishment" for what it calls "heinous crimes."

Khadr is in the process of a $20 million wrongful imprisonment lawsuit against the federal government.

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