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The Canadian Vibrator Company That Tracked User Data Will Pay $3.75 Million Settlement

Makers of the We-Vibe have also agreed to delete all the sex toy–related personal info they stored without users' consent.

by Sarah Berman
Mar 14 2017, 7:07pm

The first time I heard about the We-Vibe I was in a sex shop in Victoria, British Columbia, where a 38-year-old woman told me about her search for something that could vibrate inside her as she goes about her daily tasks. She was scoping out the Canadian-made sex toy because it could be controlled remotely via an app on her partner's phone—a fantasy that seemed genuinely futuristic three years ago.

Now the future has truly arrived, as the sex-toy maker is paying out a massive $3.75 million settlement to make a class-action lawsuit go away. Standard Innovation, the company that seemingly invented remote-control vag-zapping, is accused of spying on users without consent and breaking a bunch of privacy laws.

A lawsuit filed in Illinois last year alleged the company was collecting "highly personal" information about its user's diddling habits, from how frequently they're taking care of business to the intensity settings they're using in real time.

Last year, the company claimed it was just using the data to improve user experience. It noticed many masturbators were using the highest setting, for example, which suggests people out there wanted more juice. 

The company has admitted no wrongdoing but has agreed to empty its Canadian servers of all the vibrator-related personal info and stop collecting it in the future.

We-Vibe app users can claim up to $10,000 in damages. According to the Ottawa Sun, there are roughly 300,000 We-Vibe owners out there, about a third of whom use the app. To the woman I met in Victoria, if you're out there, getting in on this cash bonanza would be the greatest act of self-love.

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