Advertisement
This story is over 5 years old
Entertainment

Evan Roth's Wikipedia GIFs Are Morphed, Multiplying Found Art

According to the self-described "Biggest Bad A** MotherF***** on the Internet," Wikipedia is still "one of the few places on the web that's really free of ego at the moment."

by Becky Chung
Oct 9 2014, 5:30pm

via

According to his snippet on Google, artist Evan Roth is the “Biggest Bad A** MotherF***** on the Internet." So, what does one do to earn that title? Well, for one thing, when he’s not studying the motion of graffiti, or mapping the hand motions of Angry Birds players, he's remixing GIFs out of found art from Wikipedia, morphing them into undulating mandalas, creepy creatures and landscapes for his GIF art series, No Original Research.

To create his No Original Research images, Roth finds strange GIFs, such as vertebrates and rhombic dodecahedrons, and then repeats and layers them on top of each other. The result, after hundreds of multiplications, forms an unrecognizable, monster GIF. Each new creation exists on its own page in his portal, and its page source links back to the Wikipedia entry upon which he found the original GIF.

“Wikipedia is one of the few places on the web that’s really free of ego at the moment, right?” he explained to Wired. “All these animated GIFs on Wikipedia that aren’t about people posting cool animated GIFs on their tumblr blog—its just like someone needed to describe how that hinge worked or how that engine worked, so they made these animations that have a reason for being there.”

So how does one go about turning 3D renderings of molecules into warped, kaleidoscopic animations? Here's a comparison between Roth's original findings and his morphed GIFs:

Original Wikipedia GIF

Image via

Roth's hack

Image via

Original Wikipedia GIF

Image via

Roth's hack

Image via

h/t Wired

Tagged:
Creators
Wikipedia
GIFs
net art
Gif
Evan Roth
found art
ANIMATED GIF
animated GIFs
GIF maker
gif artist
No Original Research
Wikipedia GIFs