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Someone "swatted" Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg and his family

Less than four months after David Hogg survived a mass shooting at his high school that left 17 dead, a group of people armed with assault rifles kicked down the door of his home.

by Christianna Silva
Jun 5 2018, 4:09pm

Less than four months after David Hogg survived a mass shooting at his high school that left 17 dead, a group of people armed with assault rifles kicked down the door of his home.

Luckily, David Hogg and his family weren’t even home when the Broward County Sheriff’s Office got a prank call that he was being held hostage. As a result, the Parkland school shooting survivor’s home was "swatted."

Multiple sheriff’s office units and a police helicopter were reportedly dispatched as part of the SWAT team around 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, after an unknown person called police to say someone had broken into the activist’s home with an AR-15 rifle and was holding the family hostage, a local ABC affiliate reported.

It didn’t take long for deputies to determine that the home was empty and that the call was unfounded. Hogg was is actually in Washington, D.C. with his mother accepting the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights award for his and his classmates’ work on the March for Our Lives.

“Swatting” is a situation created by someone making a hoax emergency call in an attempt to lure emergency responders, a SWAT team, or other armed law enforcement officers to the victim's home. Swatting can be prosecuted as a felony for the caller and has resulted in death in the past.

This kind of action is one of many tools online aggressors use in online fights — something Hogg has been the target of for some time now.

Cover image: Getty