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Meek Mill: "I Feel Like I Will Be Free One Day"

In an interview with CNN, Meek Mill talks to Don Lemon about the possibility of a retrial for his 2017 arrest.

by Kristin Corry
Apr 17 2018, 2:35pm

Meek Mill has been extremely vocal on his experience with the criminal justice system since his arrest last November. He spoke out to Rolling Stone and even gave an optimistic phone interview with NBC's Lester Holt, saying he thinks God put him in the position he’s in to “open up eyes for other young black men.” Calling in from Chester State Correctional Facility, Meek Mill spoke to Don Lemon last night and provided more details on what has become a bizarre exchange with the judge assigned to his case , Judge Genece Brinkley.

"I feel like I will be free one day... I think I'll be able to get my chance pretty soon. My time coming," he says. The Philadelphia rapper has been remained positive throughout this ordeal, but he's also not ignorant to the fact that there's been prejudice in his case due to his celebrity.

I try not to do too much negative thinking on her because my life is in her hands... If the DA is offering that I get bail, that I get a new trial, 60 days is a little outrageous. Eighty cases go in front of a judge on Friday and mine will be the only one that's heard in June.


He also acknowledges that he's played a role in his situation, but is still maintaining his innocence.

I'm not perfect. I didn't commit the crime. I didn't point a gun at two officers... With all these young men getting shot for reaching for a cell phone, I happened to make it from the ghetto to be on the road to success. That was lucky enough. You think I'm lucky enough to point a gun at two or three officers at one time without a shot being fired at me? That's like, almost impossible.


In the interview, he shares his thoughts on the state of the criminal justice system.

If I would've got locked up in Starbucks just for sitting in Starbucks by mistake and got a technical violation, legally, a judge would be able to sentence me to 2-4 years, 3-6 years, 5-10 years, just for having police contact. I don't think nobody should lose their freedom for not even committing crimes.


Since being away since November, he's had time to think about what the black community should be doing to push criminal justice reform.


The most important thing I want to say is vote. When its time to vote for governors, time to vote for judges, DAs... Vote. Let's vote for people that's into justice reform and helping the urban community because we're being affected by it but we're not holding any political presence.


Watch the full interview below.

Kristin Corry is a staff writer for Noisey. Follow her on Twitter .