Advertisement
Food by VICE

18 Apple Recipes Because You Thought Apple Picking Would Be "So Fun"

You picked this apple bed, and now you have to lie in it.

by Munchies Staff
Oct 16 2018, 8:00pm

They got you. You got suckered into the thing. The “let’s drive to a just-barely farm-country-ish place with an aesthetically pleasing vibe where they let you pick a ‘bushel’ of apples you don’t actually have any idea how to use” thing. So, now, you have a bushel of apples. Do you even know what kind they are? We hope to goddess, for your sake, that they’re not red delicious apples. Anyhow, it’s officially fall. And whether it’s your friends peer pressuring you into the pick-your-own experience, or you have a blackout moment at the farmer’s market and end up walking away with enough apples to start your own cider business, we’ve got you covered. We’ve got no shortage of suggestions for delicious ways to use everyone’s favorite fruit of the season. Here's a little collection of some of the best of MUNCHIES' archival recipes to get you through fall without getting sick of apples.


Tom Burford, an expert on the American apple, gives us this wisdom about making the perfect apple pie: “A good crust can forgive less-than-perfect apples, but a bad crust ruins the pie, apples and all.” (So be careful with that crust!)


These doughnuts are light, fluffy, and not overly sweet (you can thank a litte bit of farmer’s cheese in the batter for that), and we could eat them every day for breakfast if given the chance.


Not great at icing layer cakes? No worries—we think this one looks better with the rustic layers visible anyway.


Fennel, apple, and sausage are an often overlooked but very reliable trio of fall flavors, and this stuffing would look so good on your Thanksgiving table.


Fresh, homemade applesauce infused with cardamom, cinnamon, and rosemary will blow any jarred stuff you’ve ever tried out of the water.


If you plan on making any latkes for the holidays this year, don’t settle for the jarred stuff—go all out with apples and pears (and just a hint of maple syrup) for something truly special.


For a very rustic, very British holiday treat, stuff your favorite apple variety with a traditional mincemeat made of warm spices and dried fruit.


You don’t need to invest in expensive juice pressing equipment just to make homemade cider—just a sauce pot and a fine mesh strainer.


We suggest using a tart green or yellow apple for this sorbet, like a Crispin (also known as a mutsu), for a great gluten-free alternative to the classic apple pie.


Toss your caramel-coated apples in toasted sesame seeds for a little nutty, savory note to cut through all that sweetness.


With equal parts apple juice and barbecue sauce, the glaze on this chicken would work just as well over pork chops or ribs.


There’s a reason pork chops and apple sauce is such a classic combo, and it’s not just because of Peter Brady. It’s because the sweetness and subtle acid of the apples is the perfect accompaniment to the fatty, savory, salty pork, and this dish is the perfect example of its highly addictive nature.


Definitely serve this crisp nice and warm, with a big scoop of vanilla ice cream for the perfect fall dessert.


You could go all out and make your own puff pastry or pie dough, but using the frozen kind for these little mini mincemeat pies is just as good.


Crisp, tart apples and peppery black radishes get dressed in a cider vinegar and honey vinaigrette for a fall salad that makes a great side dish to heavier cold weather dishes.


Use both pressed apple cider and apple cider vinegar to give these carrots a tangy, sweet glaze that balances well with creamy, mild ricotta.


Skip the canned, gelatinous stuff this year, and make your own cranberry sauce for the holidays. To help cut some of the extreme tartness of straight-up cranberries, add a bit of apple cider and a touch of maple syrup.

Want to try your hand at fermenting beverages at home? Beet kvass is an easy place to start. And if you’re not super fond of the earthiness of beets, add an apple to the mash for a little sweetness.