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Artists Examine 'The Problem of God' in a Massive Group Show

The new group show deconstructs a visual vocabulary of the religion in 120 artworks from 30-some artists, including Francis Bacon, James Turrell, and Ad Reinhardt.

by Sami Emory
Aug 25 2015, 7:30pm

Boris Mikhailov, Case History – Requiem, 1997/98, C-print; Photo © Kunstsammlung NRW

The Problem of God group show deconstructs the visual vocabulary of Christianity in 120 artworks. The exhibit, which opens September 26 at Kunstsammlung's K21 Ständehaus venue in Düsseldorf, boasts a lineup of some 30 painters, sculptors, photographers, and videographers. Together, this assemblage—which includes work from the formidable Francis Bacon, James Turrell, and Ad Reinhardt—weaves a complex cultural narrative, spanning the last 25 years of art. In this manner, the works are representative of a collective memory bolstered through diverse artistic repurposings of Christian iconography; at times analytical, occasionally comical, and always symbolic.

Michaël Borremans, The Bread, 2012, HD Video; Photo © Kunstsammlung NRW; courtesy of The North America Office of Duesseldorf Tourism and Duesseldorf Airport.

The press release elaborates: “The Problem of God is not a show of sacred art or even about religion in general," but rather, "fundamental questions of human life and existence, philosophical and spiritual challenges, and explorations [...] of different aspects of religion and faith.” The show is presented by The North America Office of Duesseldorf Tourism and Duesseldorf Airport. 

Katarzyna Kozyra, Looking for Jesus, 2012, Video; Photo: Katarzyna Szumska, Courtesy of the Katarzyna Kozyra Foundation © Kunstsammlung NRW.

Berlinde de Bruyckere, Schmerzensmann IV, 2006; Photo © Mirjam Devriend © Kunstsammlung NRW

The Problem of God opens September 26 at Kunstsammlung's K21 Ständehaus and remains on view until January 24, 2015. Read more about it on the exhibition's page

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