Entertainment

Glitch Art Rugs Weave Technology into Tradition

An ancient art collides with the digital in Faig Ahmed's latest exhibition.

by Kara Weisenstein
Nov 15 2016, 2:25pm

Coherency, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Intricately patterned rugs glitch and pixelate in the fascinating fibrous constellations of Faig Ahmed. When you first see's work, it's hard to understand what you're looking at. The carpets look digitally rendered, as if a cheeky developer plugged data points emulating ancient tapestries into a software program and then scrambled the results. But although they look like computer-generated creations, Ahmed's intricate artworks are actually entirely woven by hand. It's a stark contrast between ancient carpet-weaving techniques from his native country of Azerbaijan and aggressively contemporary ideas of digital manipulation, pixelation, and distortion.

On November 17, Ahmed opens a new solo show at Sapar Contemporary in New York City. Source Code is an interrogation of consciousness and language, drawing on the traditions of woven textiles. The show dissects our ideas of symbolism and communication, translating ancient modes of literally weaving stories into tapestries with the ways we present ideas in the digital age. 

Check out a selection of Ahmed's works being shown as part of Source Code below:

Wave Function, Faig Ahmed, 2016 Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

De stabilization, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Epiphany, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Chelebi, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Door of Doors, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Essence, Faig Ahmed, 2015. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Effusion, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

DNA, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

You have wings, Faig Ahmed, 2016. Image Courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Faig Ahmed's Source Code is on view at Sapar Contemporary in New York City from November 17, 2016–January 5, 2017. Click here for more information. 

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