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This Man's Starbucks Cup Told Him He Was Going to Get Diabetes

Would you eat a slice of your coworker’s obligatory birthday cake if it were able to telepathically show you how many trips to the gym it would take to work off its fondant goodness?

by Alex Swerdloff
Apr 11 2016, 7:00pm

Photo via Flickr user xinghao910102

Would you eat a slice of your coworker's obligatory birthday cake if it were able to telepathically show you how many trips to the gym it would take to work off its fondant goodness? How about if your waiter began singing "Danny Boy" before you bit into your cheeseburger, in memoriam of the cow you were about to consume?

Starbucks' policy of writing customers' names on their cups has led to some pretty grand controversy. Typically, the ire of customers is raised because of a gross misspelling of a name. Starbucks' inclusive policy when it comes to holiday greetings on cups has also pissed some people off. But one coffee slinger in a Jacksonville, Florida outlet took passive-aggressive cup battles to a new level. Starbucks had to apologize for the behavior of its barista when a Florida man alerted them that he had received a coffee cup with these words, instead of his name, written on this drink: "Diabetes here I come."

Now no one will deny that many Starbucks beverages are sugar bombs waiting to explode in the collective pancreases of the chain's customer base, but one doesn't expect the message to come via a note scrawled on your cup. Worst of all, the recipient says that he has two sisters who have struggled with Type 1 diabetes since elementary school.

READ MORE: How a Starbucks Barista Saved This Man from Certain Humiliation

In an email to Florida's Action News Jax, Starbucks said, "We strive to provide an inclusive and positive experience for our customers, and we're disappointed to learn of this incident. We are working directly with the customer to apologize for his experience, and with our partners (employees) to ensure this does not happen again." MUNCHIES reached out to Starbucks for comment, who told us the following: "This Starbucks barista actually has a friendly relationship with this customer and unfortunately wrote the comment on the cup as a joke. Our partner employee truly feels terrible about this incident."

We're wondering what will Starbucks' new training program—the one that will ensure this doesn't happen again—look like? Perhaps this: Employees, listen up. No unsolicited medical advice to customers. We plan on letting them find out the hard way.

If so, it's back to misspelled names on cups for baristas. Turns out, barista's can be thoughtful in their own cattily acerbic way—you just might not appreciate it.

Tagged:
Health
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barista
Diabetes
service industry
Starbucks
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