Photos of Drag Queens and Kings Dragging Donald Trump's UK Visit

The LGBTQ community turned up in full force—and full drag—to protest President Donald Trump's first visit to the UK.

|
Jul 16 2018, 4:34pm

This weekend marked President Donald Trump's first presidential visit to the UK, and cities all over the country made it clear that he was an unwanted guest. Almost 10,000 people marched through Edinburgh, Scotland, with more protests in Sheffield, Glasgow, and Dundee. Demonstrators even gathered outside the Trump Turnberry Resort to boo him as he played golf ahead of his Monday meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. (He waved as they chanted "No Trump, no KKK, no racist USA.")

London was ground zero for the biggest protest yet, with over 250,000 people hitting the streets of on a blisteringly hot Friday to stand up to Trump. The march snaked from Portland Place to Trafalgar Square in the city center, with signs reading "Dump Trump" and "I could shit a better president," and a Trump baby blimp taking flight above the crowds in Parliament Square.

The Drag Protest Parade was the brightest and most eye-catching contingent of all. Organized by drag performers Liquorice Black, Cheddar Gorgeous, Anna Phylactic, Violet Blonde, Jonny Bank, and Donna Trump, it called on "kings, queens, queers, and our allies" to come in their most disgustingly opulent outfits to "say a collective 'Bye Felicia' to the UK's latest dishonorable diplomatic guest."

Broadly sent photographer Alice Zoo to document the UK LGBTQ community in all its glory as it protested in solidarity with their queer brothers, sisters, and siblings.

Maya: "There’s no reason why I wouldn’t do something to outwardly show that I’m not okay with this."

Maya, 21, from Paris, France

Why did you come down today to protest Trump?
I just think, given the opportunity, there’s no reason why I wouldn’t do something to outwardly show that I’m not okay with this, and this is such a great opportunity to show that so loudly.

Why join the drag protest?
I feel that I can talk best with the way I look and the way I dress up. I think that says the most for me.

What effect is Trump having on LGBTQ people?
Can I just say bad? Even just his opinions being so widespread can’t help anybody who feels insecure about themselves or in the minority, so just seeing that out there being such a strong voice can’t help anyone that’s got a quiet voice.

What would you like to tell him?
Goodbye!

Liquorice Black: "We’re here to show our support and solidarity for diverse communities."

Liquorice Black, 25, from Manchester, UK

Why is it important to come down today and protest Trump?
We’re here basically to represent the LGBT community, and also represent other communities such as people of color and show our solidarity in defending people’s rights to be diverse... You can already see with some of Trump’s policies so far, with the trans people in the army and the bathroom laws that are happening. So we’re here to show our support and solidarity for diverse communities and also just be very visual, and make sure that our own government know that we won’t stand for anything that takes away anybody’s rights.

What was your outfit inspired by?
It’s made out of lots of different newspaper articles, and things that resemble America, so we’ve got the dollar bill and things like that, but we’ve also got slogans like Black Lives Matter on there, Make America Great Again—lots of different elements that are linked to Trump and America. And also things like Theresa May and Rupert Murdoch, so there’s lots of different things going on. It’s all a bit subliminal. It’s all a patchwork of different things put together.

What message would you like to deliver to Trump?
I would say defend diversity, don’t discriminate against.

Fran and Lisa: "I’m very, very appalled by what’s going on right now in the US."

Fran, 32, from London, UK and Lisa, 29, from Germany

Why was it important for you to come down today and protest Trump?
Lisa: I’m half-American and I’m very, very appalled by what’s going on right now in the US, and what is happening with that clown in the office. It’s really, really, really embarrassing as an American, and so I feel the need to go out on the street and tell everybody he’s not appreciated.
Fran: I’ve come down to join everyone to make the point that that man does not represent us. He does not represent good, kind people with love in their hearts in this society. He’s done some deplorable things and I’ve come to stand against him.

Why protest in drag?
Lisa: Because it’s fun! Because it’s fun, fun, fun, and I think that’s very important right now at the moment, to have a lot of fun, because there’s so much shit happening.

What effect do you think Trump is having on LGBTQ people?
Fran: There has been an increase in hate crime that is just in the same trajectory as his popularity has grown. I think that this is a great way to come [out] against him, and the people that support him as well… Also, yeah, it’s fun! This is a show of love and solidarity and it’s important.

What message do you want to deliver to Trump?
Lisa: Love! Love thy neighbor.

Jack the Lad: "Drag is a beautiful expression of our inward selves, and Trump does not allow that."

Jack the Lad, 21, from Manchester, UK

Why was it important to come down today and protest?
Because fascists, racist and fucktards are not welcome in this country.

Why join in drag?
Because drag is a beautiful expression of our inward selves, and Trump does not allow that. So even though he doesn’t like my outward self, i.e. the colour of my skin, this is another part of me that he doesn’t like and anything I can do to offend him, I’m gonna do it.

What effect do you think Trump is having on LGBTQ people?
As a queer person of color, the first thing he’s had an effect on is a massive amount of racism. As an LGBT person, he doesn’t think that we have the right to serve or to be served in businesses. Ultimately, the pink pound actually creates a lot of money so it’s really stupid for the economy for him to to be against LGBT people. We have a hell of a lot of money because most of us don’t have kids.

What was your outfit inspired by?
I wanted to wear the brightest most garish thing that I could, and my wife hates this waistcoat which is why I put it on!

Dennis Queen: "We’re here to make sure Donald Trump knows how unwelcome he is in our lovely country."

Dennis Queen, 45, from Manchester, UK

Why was it important for you to come down today and protest Trump?
We’re here to make sure Donald Trump knows how unwelcome he is in our lovely country, and tell him to go home.

What effect do you think he’s having on LGBTQ people?
I go out to the US about once a year, so I’ve got a lot of activism colleagues out there. Things are really changing just in the time that I’ve been visiting the US… Now I get stopped every time I go through customs because they don’t like the look of my passport in terms of how I look and what my name is—because obviously I look like a girl and I have a man’s name on my passport. I got wiped down for explosives on the way in and on the way out last time.

So even just in terms of border control we’re seeing differences, and we’re just the tip of the iceberg given his awful immigration policies which are only really rivalled by our own awful immigration policies. It’s hard. There’s so much to say because as queer people we’re not just queers; we’re also queer people of colour, we’re also queer disabled people, and we’re also queer women. Lots of us have multiple oppressions, and this guy seems to be in this sort of mini competition with himself to make sure he hits every single one of those groups.