Food by VICE

Get Your Goat and Serve It With These Spicy Korean Dumplings

The rice cakes and spicy gochujang in this dish from Houston's Underbelly are traditionally Korean, but the tender braised goat is straight outta Texas.

by Munchies Staff
Jun 13 2016, 2:00pm

Photo courtesy of Julie Soefer Photography

Photo courtesy of Julie Soefer Photography

Photo courtesy of Julie Soefer Photography
gochujang

Ever find yourself with a whole, freshly killed goat and wonder what the hell to do with it?

OK, maybe not. But goat meat is something to get excited about. For starters, three-quarters of the world eats it—in America, we're kind of the odd men (and women) out by barely partaking in the stuff. But not only is goat meat tender, flavorful, and hearty, it's also nutritious, low in fat, and easy to raise on American soil. So in short: give goat a shot.

Out in Houston, Texas, chef Chris Shepherd of Underbelly is making cuisine that combines Texas's local agricultural bounty with the international influences of its incredibly diverse population. So what does a decidedly Houstonian chef do with a traditional Korean dish? Make it with goat from a local farm. Duh.

The rice cakes and spicy in this dish are quintessentially Korean, but the tender braised goat is straight outta Texas. Make it at home, and be transported to two distinctly different places with each bite.

RECIPE: Korean Braised Goat and Dumplings

By the way, you can find goat meat at your local specialty butcher or at ethnic grocery stores. No need to raise your own in the backyard.