Would You Rock High Heels Made from Fossils?

Alexander McQueen would have approved.

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Feb 20 2017, 5:25am

Alchemy, images courtesy the artist

This article was originally published on June 18, 2015 but we think it still rocks!

Move over McQueen, because Belarusian fashion designer Anastasia Radevich is now in the running for having made the wildest women's shoes around. Using fossils, barnacles, and even blowtorches as her inspiration, Radevich calls the designs in her latest collection, Alchemy, "footwear artifacts."

It makes sense, considering that each takes months of research and two to three weeks of craftmanship to create. "The process begins with a mad search of inspiration," Radevich tells Creators. She walked us through the process of designing and creating a pair of her flamboyant high heels, from forming a "proper dialogue" of ideas in her sketchbook, to a phase of "experimental baking, sculpting, casting and metalwork," followed by designing the pattern for the surface of the shoe. "Pattern-making lately has become a playground for breaking the rules," she says. The last step is to sew it all together so everything fits, in her words, "like Lego."

stranichki.jpg

Radevich's sketchbook

Growing up as the descendent of two generations of shoemakers, as well as studying at the London College of Fashion, pushed Radevich toward experimenting with tools from other mediums, including woodcarving, sculpting and smithing, and techniques like galvanization, rusting, silk printing, and 3D printed design. She stresses that she "always thinks of aesthetics and how they support the message and use the metaphor and mystery to draw the viewer to the shoe piece." 

Radevich currently has five different collections of high heels, Alchemy, Lost Civilizations, Kinetik, Dreamfall, and Biofuture. Check out examples of her most recent works below:

Alchemy

Alchemy

Lost Civilizations

Alchemy

Lost Civilizations

Lost Civilizations

Lost Civilizations

Alchemy

Lost Civilizations

Alchemy

Lost Civilizations

Click here to visit Anastasia Radevich's website. 

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