Takashi Murakami Floods Paris with Effervescent Neo-Pop Art

The latest monographic show from iconic Japanese modern artist, Takashi Murakami, presses refresh on his signature, eclectic aesthetic.

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Nov 5 2016, 11:35am

Homage to Francis Bacon (Three Studies for Portrait of George Dyer [on light ground]), 2016. Acrylic and platinum and gold leaf on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, Each:39 ⅜ x 39 ⅜ in. Photo: Claire Dorn. © 2016 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved. All images courtesy the artist and Galerie Perrotn

Skulls and self-repeating, mise en abyme-style imagery figure prominently into a collection of abstract-meets-traditional artwork at a new solo exhibition at Galerie Perrotin. Japanese media artist Takashi Murakami has developed a signature voice, creating loud, brilliant pieces of Neo-Pop art influenced by Japanese culture and street-art acknowledgments. Keeping to his brash and playful aesthetic, the artist floods the Parisian gallery space with his circle-driven collection of paintings, flush with hyper-saturated, stippled color. The solo show also will include new triptychs, diptychs, as well as sculptural elements.

Guardians of the Sunken Caribbean Treasure, 2016. Acrylic, platinum leaf and gold leaf on canvas mounted on wood panel, Ø 98 7/10 in. Photo : Claire Dorn. © 2016 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

View of the exhibition of Takashi Murakami’s “Learning the Magic of Painting” at Galerie Perrotin, Paris from September 10 to December 23, 2016. Photos: Claire Dorn. All artworks © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

In the show, Learning the Magic of Painting, the artist dives into a creative process where he takes his doctoral training in Nihonga painting and combines it with his interest in the art of Francis Bacon. Murakami is also known to channel his artistic alter ego, Mr. Dob, who “[morphs] its own form, and whose ambivalent personality shifts from friendly to fierce, seemingly at will,” according to a gallery description.

View of the exhibition of Takashi Murakami’s “Learning the Magic of Painting” at Galerie Perrotin, Paris from September 10 to December 23, 2016

The artist speaks a little about his process in an English-French translation with Galerie Perrotin: “The works for this show, then, are also the records of my learning along the way. I have been working my way in earnest, but I am still far from arriving at the essence of my magic. But I believe each of the works contains some fragments of my] essence—even if they turn out to be tragedies—I choose to believe so anyway. Will I really manage to create the magic circle that can summon.”

View of the exhibition of Takashi Murakami’s “Learning the Magic of Painting” at Galerie Perrotin, Paris from September 10 to December 23, 2016

Dragon Heads – Gold, 2015. Gold leaf on carbon fiber and glass fiber, 51 ⅞ X 32 ¾ in. Photo : Claire Dorn. © 2015 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Kōrin: Unknown, Even in Death, 2016. Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 39 ⅜ x 39 ⅜ in. Photo: Claire Dorn. © 2016 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Title to be determined, 2016. Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminium framE, 59 1/16 x 59 1/16 in. Photo: Claire Dorn. © 2016 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Ensō: Black Hole, 2015. Acrylic and platinum and gold leaf on canvas mounted on aluminum frame. 66 15/16 x 56 15/16 in. Photo: Claire Dorn. © 2015 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Amitābha Buddha descends, Looking over his shoulder, 2015. Acrylic, gold leaf and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board. 118 ⅛ x 148 13/16 in. © 2015 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

To learn more about Takashi Murakami’s solo show at Galerie Perrotin, visit the exhibit’s page here. The show runs until December 23, 2016 in Paris.

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