Maia Szalavitz

Maia Szalavitz is a reporter and author who focuses on science, public policy, and addiction treatment. She's the author of the New York Times bestseller Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction.

High Wire

The Mysterious Consequences of Repeatedly Overdosing on Opioids

Experts are concerned we'll see a rise in brain damage among people who survive multiple ODs in the age of fentanyl.
Maia Szalavitz
6.5.19
Fighting Words

After Leaving Thousands in Agony, the CDC Is Finally Clarifying Its Painkiller Restrictions

The agency is addressing the widespread suffering caused by the crackdown on opioids—the result of predictable misapplication of its guidelines.
Maia Szalavitz
4.25.19
High Wire

Fentanyl Speedballs Are the Latest Disturbing Trend in America's Opioid Crisis

Deliberately mixing the powerful and deadly drug with stimulants like coke and meth is one (dangerous) way users are adjusting to a new market.
Maia Szalavitz
4.25.19
Fighting Words

Big Pharma’s Millions Won’t Solve the Opioid Crisis

Money from the first big opioid addiction settlement is being spent in the wrong places.
Maia Szalavitz
4.10.19
Harm Reduction

How One Group Is Expanding Access to Overdose-Reversing Drugs Through the Mail

Since people can already order fentanyl and other harmful drugs via the darknet, NEXT wants to make obtaining items that reduce harm just as easy to get.
Maia Szalavitz
3.1.19
High Wire

The Deadly Worst-Case Scenario for America's Xanax Obsession

Cracking down on the legal supply is not a solution. In fact, it could spell disaster.
Maia Szalavitz
2.13.19
Fighting Words

Addictive Drugs Should Not be Marketed, Period

New findings about the pressure to sell OxyContin reveals a lot about the opioid crisis.
Maia Szalavitz
1.18.19
High Wire

All the Things the New Anti-Weed Crusade Gets Horribly Wrong

It's Reefer Madness all over again, somehow.
Maia Szalavitz
1.14.19
Harm Reduction

An Influential Think Tank Suggested That Harm Reduction Doesn't Work

The Brookings Institution claimed that syringe exchange programs and overdose-reversing drugs will make the addiction crisis worse—ignoring decades of public health data. With record opioid overdose deaths, getting these recommendations right matters.
Maia Szalavitz
12.13.18
Fighting Words

Insurance Is Supposed to Cover Addiction Treatment, But It's Still a Nightmare

The barriers insurance companies place in the way of treatment are killing people.
Maia Szalavitz
12.10.18
High Wire

The Radical New Fentanyl Trend That Could Save Lives and Screw Dealers

One $5 or $10 fatal dose could become dozens or even hundreds of nonfatal highs.
Maia Szalavitz
11.20.18
healthcare guides

This Is How to Get Health Insurance to Cover Treatment for Opioid Addiction

Although the Affordable Care Act is supposed to guarantee addiction treatment to anyone with insurance, people with opioid addictions still face a dysfunctional system.
Maia Szalavitz
11.6.18
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