socializing

7.25.18

Conservatives can’t stop melting down about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and socialism

The specter of socialism is haunting the U.S. and it’s spooking the hell out of conservatives.

5.9.17

I Tried to Turn an AI Bot into My BFF

Because why should superficial friendships be limited to flesh and blood?

12.12.16

Why 'Going Out' Is an Act of Survival and Rebellion

In the series premiere of our new VICELAND show 'BIG NIGHT OUT,' we look at the ways people escape the mundanities and tragedies of life through partying.

7.1.16

Everyone Lies to Avoid Hanging Out with Each Other, Study Says

Four out of five Americans said they made up excuses in order to avoid going out and instead played video games, ate in, or did chores.

1.20.16

Power Moves for Parties: Moving Beyond 'Nice to Meet You'

Parties are terrible. Here's how to make them worse.

12.31.15

When Babies Squad Up

It's important to let babies squad up. That's how they trade baby info and compare baby notes and kick all of their baby activities up a notch.

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12.16.15

I Went to a Secret Illegal Party in the Iranian Desert

In Iran, getting together with your friends for a night of dancing and drinking is against the law—but that doesn't mean that young people don't do it.

12.9.15

Michael Spaces Out in This Week's Comic from Stephen Maurice Graham

And in his mind, much like reality, he's a lone traveler.

5.27.15

‘TimeSplitters: Future Perfect’ Is the Game That Helped Me Survive College

I was in an antisocial shell after a suicide attempt, but multiplayer gaming brought me back.

1.5.15
9.6.12

Brandon Jacobs Called My Friend a "Lil Watermelon Head Ass"

San Francisco 49ers running back Brandon Jacobs is a bipolar socialite when it comes to interacting with fans. One minute he’s parading around a bounce house with a six-year-old and another he's insulting my dimwit friend on Twitter. In other words, he...

6.2.08

On With The Sonidero!

Sonideros are commonly described as the club DJs of Mexico. Towards the end of the 1950s, they began to liven up neighbourhood dances, block parties, and popular salons in Mexico City.