Hundreds of QAnon Believers Are Still in Dallas Waiting for JFK to Show Up

In videos shared by those in attendance, young children can be seen standing in the crowd holding QAnon signs late into the evening.
President John F. Kennedy at the White House just prior to a joint radio-television speech to the nation. (Getty Images)​
President John F. Kennedy at the White House just prior to a joint radio-television speech to the nation. (Getty Images)
Logo_Disinfo Dispatch Padding
Unraveling viral disinformation and explaining where it came from, the harm it's causing, and what we should do about it.

Two weeks after hundreds of people gathered in Dallas to witness what they believed was going to be the return of John F. Kennedy and JFK Jr., another large crowd gathered in downtown Dallas once again in the vain hope of seeing the former president resurrected.

The group has been in Dallas since the beginning of the month when they initially gathered based on the prediction that JFK was going to be resurrected on Nov. 2. 

Advertisement

That prediction was made by Michael Brian Protzman, a former demolition expert who has amassed a huge following in recent months by using a bastardized version of the Hebrew numerology system known as Gematria to make wild predictions about former President Donald Trump, QAnon, and the Kennedys.

Having spent two weeks holed up in the city, the group once again gathered at Dealey Plaza on Monday because according to the Julian calendar—which Protzman claims they should now be following—Monday was Nov. 1, and so JFK was actually going to reappear at midnight.

Throughout the day Monday, crowds of over 100 people gathered in Dealey Plaza, holding up signs bearing QAnon slogans and pro-Trump rhetoric as well as signs welcoming back JFK, who was assassinated at that location almost 58 years ago.

In videos shared by those in attendance, young children can be seen standing in the crowd holding QAnon signs late into the evening. One former follower of Protzman told VICE News last week that she witnessed children outside asleep on the ground in the early hours of the morning when the group initially met two weeks ago. As night fell and JFK once again failed to reappear, the group gathered and recited the Lord’s Prayer before breaking into a rendition of We Are the World, a song co-written by Michael Jackson. 

Advertisement

Two weeks ago, when JFK failed to materialize, Protzman led his followers to a $300-a-ticket Rolling Stones concert that was taking place in the city and now claims without any evidence that the band had actually been replaced by Jackson (playing Mick Jagger), JFK Jr. (Keith Richards), and Prince (drummer Steve Jordan), while one of the backing singers was replaced by Aaliyah, the U.S. singer who died in a plane crash in 2001.

Since then, the group has been holed up in the Hyatt hotel in Dallas, with videos posted to the group’s Telegram channels showing them dancing and singing, while Protzman continues to make wild predictions. In audio chats on Telegram channels populated by Protzman’s followers, the group’s members have discussed plans to establish a permanent base in the area, with one member of the group claiming his family has a property that could be used.

Protzman has also been seeking donations from his online followers to fund the group’s accommodations, food, and suits and ball gowns for the inaugural ball he predicts will happen when JFK returns.

On Sunday evening, pictures of Protzman wearing a tinfoil hat inside the hotel were posted to the Telegram channel.

Telegram/@Negative48

Telegram/@Negative48

One of the people who helped organize travel and accommodations for the group told VICE News last week she estimated that up to 1,000 people went to Dallas for the event. Since then, the number has dwindled, but Monday night’s gathering clearly shows plenty of people are still under Protzman’s influence and willing to believe that JFK will return.

The Dallas Police Department told VICE News that it was aware of the group gathering in the city, calling them “cooperative” and adding that there was no sign of a counterprotest.

“Our primary objective is to provide a safe environment for individuals desiring to exercise their First Amendment right to peaceful assembly and freedom of speech,” Juan Fernandez, a public information officer, said in an emailed statement.

Want the best of VICE News straight to your inbox? Sign up here.