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Haçienda DJ Dave Haslam Sells Entire Record Collection to Seth Troxler

The Manchester maestro's blessed Seth with over 4000 records.
November 24, 2015, 3:05pm

Record collections are great, aren't they? There's something incredible about rummaging around someone else's entire stash, creating a kind of biography through 12"s, working out what makes them tick, seeing who they were, who they wanted to be and who they became.

News has just broken that Dave Haslam, former Haçienda resident and author of Life After Dark: A History of British Nightclubs & Music Venues, has sold his entire record collection to none other than Seth Troxler.

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The collection, which stretches to around 4,500 records, is a slice of club culture history. Given both Seth and Dave's standing in dance music, it seems like an ideal fit.

Seth explains "as a music fan and collector the opportunity to acquire Dave's records was something that instantly sparked my interest. As a 30 year old there is only so much you can read about or hear through friends to imagine what it was like during the heyday of acid house and the Haçienda. I think my great joy will be finding new music, hearing things i never knew existed from people forgotten through time. I think it's very important not only to preserve the music but to preserve this collection intact for future generations to enjoy. One factor behind my acquirement of this amazing collection was the transfer of one working DJ to another; and the fact that I will be presenting to people around the world as they were intended to be heard".

Of the sale Dave says, ""My thirty years of DJing is in this collection, including all the records I played on the four hundred occasions I played at the Hacienda in the 1980s, beginning with funk and soul and electro and Factory Records stuff, and on through industrial and alternative music and into the early acid tunes and the house music revolution. And then the 1990s too, bleepy stuff, disco, the euphoric floorfillers, and the wild and weird records I loved and wanted to share with dancefloors from Manchester to Paris and Berlin to New York I had some tempting offers, but keeping the collection together was an important thing for me. When Seth got in touch I was really pleased. The records were bought by me to be played – it's a working DJ's collection - and Seth's commitment to music and to vinyl is fabulous. There's stuff in there he'll know and love but stuff he'll discover too, and through him, and thanks to him taking them on and playing them out, new audiences will discover them too, and enjoy them. They'll give pleasure to Seth's audiences, just as they gave pleasure to me and the audiences I played them too. I'll miss them but they've gone to a great home."

The big handover takes place early next month. Hopefully Seth'll tell us exactly what was on Dave's shelves!