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OK Go Harnesses The Power Of HTML5 To Deliver Kaleidoscopic Images To Your Browser

OK Go’s latest video is even more innovative than the ones that came before it.

Ever since the release of OK Go’s "Here It Goes Again" five years ago—you know, the one where the guys move between several treadmills in a charmingly choreographed routine—each of their subsequent music videos has wowed viewers with fresh, yet simple displays of creativity. Each single the band releases escalates this aesthetic to new, hypnotic heights, but the foundation generally remains the same: a single, unedited take of the band dancing to rigidly synchronous choreography. There are variations on the theme, such as ["This Too Shall Pass,"](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qybUFnY7Y8w&feature=artistob&playnext=1&list=TL7Gkg26q-QXY ) featuring possibly one of the most elaborate Rube Goldberg machines ever concocted, and "White Knuckles," showcasing an extraordinary canine cast.

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While the videos themselves are always delightfully quirky, their delivery methods have been pretty standard. That’s changed with this week’s release of "All Is Not Lost." There’s still an ordinary stream-and-view version, embedded above. But for a more participatory experience, check out the interactive HTML5 version. To create this version, OK Go partnered with the dance company Pilobolus, director-choreographer Trish Sie, and a team at Google to bring what is certainly one of the most unique dance choreography projects ever produced. Shot from below a large glass surface, the band and company of dancers move in and out of multiple frames with precision, creating an uncommon angle of the kinetic human form.

When you first enter the site for the interactive version, you are asked to type in a phrase. This set of English or Japanese characters will appear later in the video, when the standard version displays the phrase "spread love." Each square frame of video is merged seamlessly to present the dancers’ feet forming the letters and symbols you selected. Once the video ends, you can save your message to the global gallery (which will go live sometime in August,) share your message via hyperlink or learn more about the production of the video.