Afroman

We Interviewed the Infamous EDM Streaker Who Loves Getting Naked at Her Favourite DJ Shows

Yes, 23-year-old Christina Platt is from Florida.

by VICE Thump
Feb 5 2015, 10:00pm


Christina Platt getting naked at a Keys N Krates show (Photo via her Facebook

23-year-old Christina Platt got her 15 minutes of Internet-fame when a grainy video of her streaking on stage at a Keys N Krates concert went viral. In the video, filmed by somebody backstage, the Canadian electronic trio's Jr. Flo is hunched over his turntables, a screaming crowd lapping up the bass blasts of GTA and Juyen Sebulba's "Hard House." Right as the beat drops, Platt leaps on stage to a chorus of hoots and whistles. She hops around with her hands raised in rage-tastic glory for a few seconds before the group's manager darts out to grab her. What happens next elevated the stunt from random act of festival foolishness to a full-blown act of notoriety: Platt squirms under the table, runs behind Jr. Flo, jumps on his back and wraps her legs around him, her bare ass cheeks gleaming in the strobe lights. The crowd loses its shit. The manager finally pulls her off, and scoops her up like an adult baby to carry her off stage. The entire episode takes less than a minute. 

Immediately, the video started blowing up online—a version posted to the Stanton Warriors' Facebook page has racked up more than 8 million views, and there are at least seven different uploads on YouTube. The incident also got the attention of several blogs, one of which even creepily posted a slideshow of her Facebook photos. 

While most people would consider being naked in front of hundreds of screaming ravers somewhere between "a mortifying reminder to go to the gym more" and "a hellish nightmare never to be recovered from," Platt never displayed even a pinch of shame. In fact, while most streakers would bask in their 15 minutes of Internet fame before returning back to their everyday, fully-clothed lives, what Platt did to hang on to her notoriety is where this story gets interesting. 

Christina Platt's #TeamPlatt kandi bracelets

She immediately started branding herself as #TeamPlatt on social media, sharing her email address on Facebook, and posting status updates about the importance of self-confidence. ("Have you ever been so comfortable with yourself where you have to pinch yourself to make sure you're real? That if you wake up, you're going to be in the same life?" she asks in a recent Facebook video.) Then she started encouraging her fans to wear "Team Platt" kandi bracelets, uniting them under the accessory of choice for ravers across the world. She even starting using the #FreetheNipple hashtag, a feminist movement popularized by Miley Cyrus on Instagram that promotes the right for women to go topless in public—which men have always been able to do. Today, she posted a video of her re-creating the Keys n Krates incident in a living room with the caption, "Let's see how many social networks I can ban myself from today…" 

This combination of confidence and thick skin meets relentless self-promotion and social media savvy turned the streaking incident into something larger than a stupid stunt—it made Christina Platt into a symbol of a certain "give-no-fucks" idea of liberation. Her 5,000 Facebook fans (capped because of Facebook's friend limitation) rally around their new idol, begging her to write their names on her boobs—she's obliged a few times—and obsessing over her risqué Snapchats. In other words, Christina Platt has built her personal brand around the idea of the EDM streaker as a movement. We caught up with Platt on the phone to talk about that infamous night, her second streaker stunt at an Afroman concert, and what it means to be #TeamPlatt. 

THUMP: Hey Christina! Tell us what happened at the Keys N Krates concert. 
Christina Platt: I heard that they were in town and I was like, no way I'm going to miss them, I'm a big fan. We showed up late, around midnight or 1AM. The venue was really small and packed. I was like, "I wanna get on stage, I wanna get naked. I'm gonna get kicked out." So this random guy with VIP brought me up to the stage, and I took my clothes off and jumped on stage. I love Jr. Flow, I wanted to hug him so badly, enjoy myself, and not make a big deal of it. The band manager came after me, they took me out to the front door where you pay to get in. They were being gentlemen and didn't want to throw me out on the street completely naked. They kept me inside, and took off their jacket to cover me up. Then they let me go back in and I started crowd surfing. That was fun because no one expects a naked girl to crowd surf, so what else can you besides put your hands up and carry her? 

What goes through your head as you're stripping your clothes off? 
The music is so good, you want to get closer. You've got these clothes hanging off you, holding you back. You can't dance properly! It's overwhelming. It's a great feeling. 

Was the Keys N Krates show the first time that you streaked? 
No, the first time I actually did it was at Life in Color festival in Miami first time a few months ago. It didn't explode like at Keys N Krates, because there were so many people. But it was so liberating. 

How do you have the balls to do this? 
I used to be super self conscious and depressed in high school. I used to cut myself and wear black all the time, or wear sweater in the middle of summer just to hide my body. Then I started working out and lost weight. The first time I streaked was the first time I felt totally confident in myself. All the recent exposure has made me super confident and egotistical. 

You streaked again at a recent Afroman concert, right? 
Yeah! Some of my friends have a band and they know him on a personal level from recording with him. First they were trying to talk me out of it—"don't do the same stunt, people want something else." After Afroman played, he was trying to cross the street by his tour van, so me and my photographer-friend ran across, showed him the video, and told him the story. I was like, "do you mind if I get a photo with you naked?" And he was like, "Nah, I don't mind." So I jumped in and we got the picture. 

Have you streaked any time since then? 
This past weekend, at the Amphitheater in Tampa, I tried to do the same damn thing and get naked to go on stage with the DJ. But it didn't work out that well because their stage is super high. For me to get on it, I had to take off all my clothes, jump on the trashcan, then jump on stage. I ended up knocking the trash can over, made a fool of myself, and security grabbed me really fast and manhandled me. 

What do you mean they manhandled you? 
They threw me out butt ass naked in the middle of the street, right into a block party that was happening. All these people took photos and videos. At first, I was ashamed. These security guys didn't have the decency—they banned me from the venue. But then people are like, "holy shit, it's the Keys N Krates girl doing her thing!" 

I ran into six cops butt ass naked, and was like, ugh fucking shit, here we go. But the cops were like, "What are you doing naked?" Eventually the Amphitheater owner Paul came out with a police officer, and was like, "This is just what she does." He requested for me to be banned but I didn't get arrested or anything. There was some creepy ass guy who was filming everything that was happening. The police officers were telling him, "You gotta get out of here or we'll arrest you." Some people were like, "Yo, have some water, take a T-shirt." So it ended well.

I saw a video of you crowdsurfing naked, and people are just grabbing you everywhere. How do you feel when that happens?  
I'm OK with people grabbing my boobs. If they try to do something more, that's gonna gross me out. I'm not a violent person, so I just try to call them out. I dunno. No one's ever gotten a finger in there! 

What does the #FreetheNipple movement mean to you?
At first it was a joke. One of my friends was like, "Have you seen this video? It's called Free the Nipple." But then [Free the Nipple] reached out to me on Instagram and they want me to support it. Personally I don't know what the movement is about. I think it's about being free to be naked? 

I saw on Facebook that you're selling tickets for people to write their names on your boobs? 
Oh my god, Michelle! That was a joke! So many people are trying to get me to do that, I just said they had to buy a ticket for a raffle. [laughs

I bet you have tons of guys trying to hit you up and creep on you. 
A lot of guys, a lot. I have thousands of unread messages. They're all out-of-state. A lot of them are really cool, I'll tell my story and my beliefs, and they'll understand. I feel like I've gained a lot of friends. 

Who are some of your favorite DJs?
RL Grime and Keys N Krates!

You recently got a tattoo that says "shred the clothes that keep us labeled." What does that mean? 
I just said it one time and was like, holy shit, that is so good, I gotta write that down and get it tattooed. People are so concerned with so many materialistic things. Like, oh what's that you're wearing, Forever 21? You gotta wear Gucci. Let's live life unlabeled, let's be comfortable in the skin that we are in right now. 

What's some of the worst criticisms you've heard about yourself? 
I cannot stand these articles slandering my name, saying all these hateful things. No one has ever called to ask me anything. They're coming up with their own opinions about me—that I'm hungry for attention, that I'm a slut, that I'm getting fingerbanged. It's fucking absurd but people believe it. I like the fame, don't get me wrong. But I think streaking is a lot of fun—it's so liberating. People are so insecure about themselves, and public nudity gets a bad rep. It's 2015, if someone wants to walk around naked then what's the big deal? 

What's some of the nice things that people say about you? 
They compliment my spirit and my don't-give-a-fuck attitude.  There's a label in Orlando Florida that's going to make a Team Platt clothing line. I want to make merchandise and kandi bracelets to get the word out there. I want to make the most out of my situation. 

Michelle Lhooq is THUMP's Features Editor and dedicated clothes-wearer- @MichelleLhooq