Amazon Is Hiring an Intelligence Analyst to Track 'Labor Organizing Threats'

Amazon is looking to hire two people who can focus on keeping tabs on labor activists within the company.
September 1, 2020, 3:33pm
Amazon workers protest

Amazon is looking to hire two intelligence analysts to track "labor organizing threats" within the company.

The company recently posted two job listings for analysts that can keep an eye on sensitive and confidential topics "including labor organizing threats against the company." Amazon is looking to hire an "Intelligence Analyst" and a "Sr Intelligence Analyst" for its Global Security Operations’ (GSO) Global Intelligence Program (GIP), the team that's responsible for physical and corporate security operations such as insider threats and industrial espionage. 

The job ads list several kinds of threats, such as "protests, geopolitical crises, conflicts impacting operations," but focuses on "organized labor" in particular, mentioning it three times in one of the listings. 

How to Organize Your Workplace Without Getting Caught

Amazon has historically been hostile to workers attempting to form a union or organize any kind of collective action. Last year, an Amazon spokesperson accused unions of exploiting Prime Day "to raise awareness to their cause" and increase membership dues. Earlier this year, the company fired Christian Smalls, a Black employee who led a protest at a fulfillment center in New York over Amazon's inadequate safety measures in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. During a meeting with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, company executives discussed plans to smear Smalls calling him "not smart, or articulate."  

These job listings show Amazon sees labor organizing as one of the biggest threats to its existence.  

Do you work at Amazon, did you used to, or do you know anything else about the company? We'd love to hear from you. Using a non-work phone or computer, you can contact Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai securely on Signal at +1 917 257 1382, on Wickr at lorenzofb, OTR chat at lorenzofb@jabber.ccc.de, or email lorenzofb@vice.com.

After this story was published, Amazon deleted the job listings and company spokesperson Maria Boschetti said in an email that "the job post was not an accurate description of the role— it was made in error and has since been corrected." The spokesperson did not respond to follow-up questions about the alleged mistake. The job listing, according to Amazon's own job portal, had been up since January 6, 2020.

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A screenshot of the now-deleted job listing on Amazon's job portal.

Dania Rajendra, the Director of the Athena Coalition, an alliance of dozens of grassroots labor groups that organize amazon workers, criticized the listing.

"Workers, especially Black workers, have been telling us all for months that Amazon is targeting them for speaking out. This job description is proof that Amazon intends to continue on this course," Rajendra told Motherboard in a statement. "The public deserves to know whether Amazon will continue to fill these positions, even if they’re no longer publicly posted."

On Monday, the Open Markets Institute, a nonprofit that studies monopolies, published a report on Amazon's employee surveillance efforts, claiming that these practices "create a harsh and dehumanizing working environment that produces a constant state of fear, as well as physical and mental anguish." 

After a week of the jobs being posted online, 71 people have applied to the Intelligence Analyst position, and 24 people to the Sr Intelligence Analyst job, according to Linkedin. The first job was posted in the Amazon Jobs portal in January, the second job on July 21, according to the company’s site.

UPDATE Sept. 1, 12:04 p.m. ET: Shortly after this story was published, Amazon removed the listings from its job portal.

UPDATE Sept. 1, 2:48 p.m. ET__: this story was updated to include Amazon’s comment.

Lauren Kaori Gurley contributed reporting.