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Mister Saturday Night Share Their Favorite Party Closers

The Brooklyn DJ duo have an insane record bag—here's some of their favorites.
March 5, 2014, 11:00pm

In this edition of Hidden Depths, we've got Brooklyn-based party duo Mister Saturday Night (aka Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin). Last year, the pair curated a set of stunning releases through their Mister Saturday Night record label, DJed around the globe, and continued throwing some of Brooklyn's finest parties throughout the year. For Hidden Depths, they've each selected five of their favourite songs to end a set with.

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JUSTIN CARTER:

Brian Blade Fellowship - "Evinrude-Fifty (Trembling)" (Blue Note, 2000)

"If I can get everyone really open, I'll drop this one. Brian Blade is one of my favorite modern-day jazzmen. He's done session drumming for everyone from Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell to Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock, but his best work is with his own group, The Brian Blade Fellowship. This song is very rooted in spiritual jazz from the 70s. It shifts between heady and propulsive."

Nuyorican Soul - "I Am The Black Gold of The Sun (4Hero Mix)" (Talkin' Loud, 1997)

"A classic! Starts off smooth, builds a little anticipation and then, boom! Organic drum n' bass. People just lose it. I lose it. Everyone loses it."

James Brown - "People Get Up And Drive Your Funky Soul (Remix)" (Polydor, 1988)

"The original mix of this song was under four minutes, but this nine-minute-plus version got released in the 80s as part of a compilation called

Motherlode

, and to me it is unquestionably the most superior James Brown song that there is. Long grooves, a sublime horn section interlude and James shouting out astrological signs, Fred Wesley and American cities with uncanny swagger. Dope, dope, dope."

Vera Ward Hall - "Black Woman (Wild Ox Moan)" (Globla Jukebox, 2010) into Burial and Four Tet "Nova" (Text, 2012)
"In the summer of 2012, one of the guys who'd been working with us, Gareth, was working his last Sunday. We got on the mic to give him thanks for everything he'd done. I then put this Vera Ward Hall song on, and as it got to the second verse, I started running it through our delay pedal, slowly bringing in Nova. During the Vera Ward Hall song, everyone surrounded Gareth and started hugging him! And then when the Four Tet and Burial song came in, everyone got locked in and had the most transcendent dance together."

"It was one of my favorite moments from any party we've thrown, ever. To get an approximation, start playing the Vera Ward Hall song in one window, and about halfway through, start Nova. They work very well together."

In this edition of Hidden Depths, we've got Brooklyn-based party duo Mister Saturday Night (aka Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin). Last year, the pair curated a set of stunning releases through their Mister Saturday Night record label, DJed around the globe, and continued throwing some of Brooklyn's finest parties throughout the year. For Hidden Depths, they've each selected five of their favourite songs to end a set with.

JUSTIN CARTER:

Brian Blade Fellowship - "Evinrude-Fifty (Trembling)" (Blue Note, 2000)

"If I can get everyone really open, I'll drop this one. Brian Blade is one of my favorite modern-day jazzmen. He's done session drumming for everyone from Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell to Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock, but his best work is with his own group, The Brian Blade Fellowship. This song is very rooted in spiritual jazz from the 70s. It shifts between heady and propulsive." 

Nuyorican Soul - "I Am The Black Gold of The Sun (4Hero Mix)" (Talkin' Loud, 1997)

"A classic! Starts off smooth, builds a little anticipation and then, boom! Organic drum n' bass. People just lose it. I lose it. Everyone loses it."


James Brown - "People Get Up And Drive Your Funky Soul (Remix)" (Polydor, 1988)

"The original mix of this song was under four minutes, but this nine-minute-plus version got released in the 80s as part of a compilation called

Motherlode

, and to me it is unquestionably the most superior James Brown song that there is. Long grooves, a sublime horn section interlude and James shouting out astrological signs, Fred Wesley and American cities with uncanny swagger. Dope, dope, dope."


Vera Ward Hall - "Black Woman (Wild Ox Moan)" (Globla Jukebox, 2010) into Burial and Four Tet "Nova" (Text, 2012)
"In the summer of 2012, one of the guys who'd been working with us, Gareth, was working his last Sunday. We got on the mic to give him thanks for everything he'd done. I then put this Vera Ward Hall song on, and as it got to the second verse, I started running it through our delay pedal, slowly bringing in Nova. During the Vera Ward Hall song, everyone surrounded Gareth and started hugging him! And then when the Four Tet and Burial song came in, everyone got locked in and had the most transcendent dance together."

"It was one of my favorite moments from any party we've thrown, ever. To get an approximation, start playing the Vera Ward Hall song in one window, and about halfway through, start Nova. They work very well together."


The Velvet Underground - "Beginning To See The Light" (MGM, 1969)
"This song's held a special place in my heart since I was a kid. I have this vivid memory of my high school buddy, John, wildly singing along to the lyrics, "There are problems in these times, but wooooooo, none of them are mine!" in his bedroom when we were getting ready to go out one night. I'm not sure why I remember that exactly, but it's certainly an appropriate sentiment about being a teenager."

"Anyway, when Lou Reed died late last year, I got the record and played the song over and over at home. Not in a sad way at all; just remembering that moment from when I was younger, and marvelling at those lyrics and at that spirit of freedom that Lou Reed embodied. He still embodies it, really. That's the great thing about art. It lets you live on. The next Sunday we had a party, and it was the last song I played. As the song and the party came to a close, everyone started to sing the final words together: "How does it feel/to be looooo - oooooved!?" And a whole new memory was born."


EAMON HARKIN:

LCD Soundsystem - "All My Friends" (DFA, 2007)

"This has only been played only once at the end of one of our parties, but it was such an epic and memorable moment that it makes the list. Justin and I always pack records that we feel are worthy of the last moment of the party, but we never plan which one we'll play or, for that matter, who will play it. The Saturday before the last Mister Sunday at Gowanus Grove, I'd packed quite a few records I thought would work at the very end before I left for an out-of-town wedding. Rok One, my old DJ partner at Studio B, was DJing the wedding, and at the end of the night he played this track. When I came home to Brooklyn the next morning, I grabbed the record before heading to the Grove. If you were there on the day, you know what happened."


Ramsey Lewis - "Party Time" (Cadet, 1967)

"Of any one track I've probably played at the end of the a party this track has been given the most airings. It was also the last track on our Little White Earbuds remix from a few years back. Even though Ramsey Lewis hailed from Chicago and most identified as a jazz musician, this record makes me think of low strung New Orleans funk every time. When we first played Sub Club on a Sunday for Optimo, I played it as the last track in response to the now famous call for "ONE MORE TUNE!" from the Glasgow crowd. Chaos ensued, and Twitch asked me later what track it was. As a life-long Optimo fan, that was a nice moment."


Johnny Osbourne - "Buddy Bye" (Jammy's, 1985)

"One of the first reggae tracks to use the 'Sleng Teng' riddim, which ultimately got reworked hundreds of times as the reggae business is prone to do. The low end on this is really fun, and has had many of the Mister regulars pogo-ing around the dance floor at the end of a good night."


Dizzy Gillespie - "Matrix" (Perception, 1970)

"We ended many a party with this number from Dizzy Gillespie last year. Super chilled, but plenty going on to keep the dancefloor moving. It also has some great build up moments to send everyone out on a high."


The Martian - "Sex In Zero Gravity" (Red Planet, 1993)

"A truly beautiful Detroit techno track from Mad Mike, and with Eddie Folks making his mark on mixing duties. I really love emotive techno which has tiny trance like elements to it. This epitomises that kind of sound."


Connect with Mister Saturday Night on their website
Connect with Mister Saturday Night on Soundcloud

The Velvet Underground - "Beginning To See The Light" (MGM, 1969)
"This song's held a special place in my heart since I was a kid. I have this vivid memory of my high school buddy, John, wildly singing along to the lyrics, "There are problems in these times, but wooooooo, none of them are mine!" in his bedroom when we were getting ready to go out one night. I'm not sure why I remember that exactly, but it's certainly an appropriate sentiment about being a teenager."

"Anyway, when Lou Reed died late last year, I got the record and played the song over and over at home. Not in a sad way at all; just remembering that moment from when I was younger, and marvelling at those lyrics and at that spirit of freedom that Lou Reed embodied. He still embodies it, really. That's the great thing about art. It lets you live on. The next Sunday we had a party, and it was the last song I played. As the song and the party came to a close, everyone started to sing the final words together: "How does it feel/to be looooo - oooooved!?" And a whole new memory was born."

EAMON HARKIN:

LCD Soundsystem - "All My Friends" (DFA, 2007)

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"This has only been played only once at the end of one of our parties, but it was such an epic and memorable moment that it makes the list. Justin and I always pack records that we feel are worthy of the last moment of the party, but we never plan which one we'll play or, for that matter, who will play it. The Saturday before the last Mister Sunday at Gowanus Grove, I'd packed quite a few records I thought would work at the very end before I left for an out-of-town wedding. Rok One, my old DJ partner at Studio B, was DJing the wedding, and at the end of the night he played this track. When I came home to Brooklyn the next morning, I grabbed the record before heading to the Grove. If you were there on the day, you know what happened."

Ramsey Lewis - "Party Time" (Cadet, 1967)

"Of any one track I've probably played at the end of the a party this track has been given the most airings. It was also the last track on our Little White Earbuds remix from a few years back. Even though Ramsey Lewis hailed from Chicago and most identified as a jazz musician, this record makes me think of low strung New Orleans funk every time. When we first played Sub Club on a Sunday for Optimo, I played it as the last track in response to the now famous call for "ONE MORE TUNE!" from the Glasgow crowd. Chaos ensued, and Twitch asked me later what track it was. As a life-long Optimo fan, that was a nice moment."

Johnny Osbourne - "Buddy Bye" (Jammy's, 1985)

"One of the first reggae tracks to use the 'Sleng Teng' riddim, which ultimately got reworked hundreds of times as the reggae business is prone to do. The low end on this is really fun, and has had many of the Mister regulars pogo-ing around the dance floor at the end of a good night."

Dizzy Gillespie - "Matrix" (Perception, 1970)

"We ended many a party with this number from Dizzy Gillespie last year. Super chilled, but plenty going on to keep the dancefloor moving. It also has some great build up moments to send everyone out on a high."

The Martian - "Sex In Zero Gravity" (Red Planet, 1993)

"A truly beautiful Detroit techno track from Mad Mike, and with Eddie Folks making his mark on mixing duties. I really love emotive techno which has tiny trance like elements to it. This epitomises that kind of sound."

Connect with Mister Saturday Night on their website
Connect with Mister Saturday Night on Soundcloud