Volume 19 Issue 1

  • It’s My Party and I’ll Cry if I Want To

    Photos by Francesco Nazardo, stylist: Ian Bradley.

  • No Warning 6: The Unfair Advantage

    If you're going to watch only one hardcore, anal-raping, lesbian-wrestling porno this year, make it "No Warning 6." The hardcore is harder! The anal is more anally!

  • The Last Exorcist

    In his book, Don claims "the devil himself, speaking through a possessed woman, threatened to disembowel me in my sleep."

  • A Few from ‘Stories’

    Photographer Jacob Aue Sobol transforms everyday interactions into moody compositions that make everything he shoots look like a snapshot from some harrowing WWII tale.

  • If You Build It, They Will Cum

    The Impropriety Society's parties started as theatrical sex-themed fund-raising events, but as they evolved, actual fucking came to the fore providing a place for a variety of kinky persuasions.

  • Topological Matter in Optical Lattices

    This month's Learnin' Corner is an explanation of topological matter in optical lattices by University of Pittsburgh associate professor of physics W. Vincent Liu.

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  • Three Chapters from The Loom of Ruin

    It's with great pride that we present to you three chapters from Sam McPheeters' first novel about a gas-station owner named Trang Yang, who has a fondness for violence.

  • Hello Again, Asshole

    Fucking Medicine Man. Fucking dumb old hippie buzzard! Telling me shit I could have told myself 100 times.

  • Assassin’s Creed: Revelations

    "Revelations" is a decrepit continuation of a once-captivating franchise, which is appropriate given that it's about the aging of its two protagonists, Ezio and Altaïr.

  • Il-Sung Songs

    Photos by Ben Ritter, Stylist: Annette Lamothe-Ramos

  • Peeling Oniontown

    There are certain places that seem forsaken. Afghanistan is one. Another lies outside the bucolic little Hudson Valley hamlet of Dover Plains. It's a place called Oniontown.

  • Biking Booth’s Escape Route

    After slaying Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth spent 12 days on the lam in a strange and tragic odyssey. To ever truly understand him, I'd have to literally retrace his footsteps.