Justin Lehmiller, PhD

Justin Lehmiller, PhD, is a research fellow at The Kinsey Institute and author of the blog Sex and Psychology. His latest book is Tell Me What You Want: The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help You Improve Your Sex Life

Fighting Words

Paedophiles Can't be 'Cured,' and It's Dangerous to Suggest They Can

A recently published paper claiming pedophiles can be cured does a disservice to people who need treatment.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
1.30.19
therapy

Psychology's Short-Lived Experiment With Nude Psychotherapy

Getting naked in therapy sessions was considered part of a search for authenticity.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
12.12.18
Sex

These Are Some of the Most Unusual Ways People Say They've Achieved Orgasm

The answers ranged from swimming to riding a horse to getting a tattoo.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
12.11.18
Sex

Being Good in Bed Is Tied to an Unexpected Personality Trait

People who rate high in conscientiousness have fewer sexual problems and more satisfying sex lives, according to a new study.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
11.7.18
Sex

One in Five Men Feel Sad After They Have Sex, Study Finds

This phenomenon, known as postcoital dysphoria, has increasingly been discussed by researchers and therapists over the last decade.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
8.20.18
Sex

Why People Have Sex With Animals

In a new study, researchers surveyed nearly 1,000 zoophiles about frequency of sex with animals, beliefs about zoophilia, and their sexual preferences and practices.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
7.18.18
Sex

Psychopaths May Have an Evolutionary Advantage

As uncomfortable as the thought may be, traits that assist in reproduction tend to get passed on.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
5.22.18
hard data

Your Parents Influence the Type of People You're Attracted To

We’re drawn to people who physically resemble our early caregivers.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
2.12.18
Health

Is Porn Really Turning Us into Craven Sexless Zombies?

America's political and religious leaders are issuing dire warnings about the damaging effects of pornography—warnings that aren't backed up by the science.
Justin Lehmiller, PhD
9.3.16