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The Hot New Drinking Game for NJ Teens Is "Jews vs. Nazis"-Themed Beer Pong

The affluent New Jersey municipality of Princeton has been rocked to its sheltered core after a group of underage teenagers was caught playing  Jews vs. Nazis, a variation on beer pong.

by Alex Swerdloff
Apr 10 2016, 2:00pm

Photo via Flickr user wolfsavard

What does arguably the world's single largest case of systematic genocide have in common with a game of beer pong played out in a high schooler's dimly lit basement? Whether or not you believe it, they both center on a group of Nazis and Jews. Plus, Anne Frank is involved in both conflicts, so there's that.

Of course, one of the aforementioned events only involved ill-advised teenagers pretending to take part in the act of genocide, while the same obviously can't be said for the other.

The affluent New Jersey municipality of Princeton has been rocked to its sheltered core after a group of underage teenagers was caught playing Jews vs. Nazis, a variation on beer pong. Worst of all, they were caught only when another student—who is said not to have been present—noticed a Snapchat photo of the event.

Here's how the relatively unknown variation of the game—which has been called both Alcoholocaust and Holocaust Pong—works. Cups are arranged in the shape of a swastika and a Star of David. Special moves include the "Anne Frank," in which the Jewish team can hide one of their cups, and the "Auschwitz," in which the Nazi team can ban one of their opponents and make him or her sit out for a period of time. A quick search on social media nets numerous instances of the game being played in some form or another.

According to Planet Princeton, a local blog, students in the photos posted to social media include athletes and peer leaders from Princeton High School, some of whom are Jewish. Imagine that: Getting in trouble for playing beer pong while underage, and drinking isn't even the problem!

Jamaica Ponder, the student blogger who first discovered the Snapchat photograph, had this to say: "I'm not even Jewish and I'm still offended. This type of behavior makes me believe that this group of guys would readily play 'pin the noose on the n*****,' just as readily as they incorporated an 'Anne Frank' cup in their noxious little game of pong. Yes, that happened. No, you can't just make this stuff up."

The Anti-Defamation League is not pleased either. Joshua Cohen, Regional Director of the organization, told The Forward, "We're concerned about this incident and the allegations that Princeton High School students might have been involved in this. I think that the images that are online are both alarming and outrageous."

People are lining up on both sides of the issue. Some call it a harmless game, others say it is much more than that: "I think an incident like this underscores and highlights a number of different issues. One, the trivialization of Nazis, Hitler and anti-Semitism by teenagers. I think it underscores the critical need for Holocaust education," Cohen said.