What Police Found in the Back of This Van Might Put You Off Kebabs for Life

Hertfordshire police stopped a van during rush hour traffic on the M25 this week after it appeared to be “dragging its rear down the road.”

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10 August 2016, 1:17pm

Photo via Flickr user oh_debby

We can all agree that the hunk of meat spinning hypnotically from the window of Star Kebabs probs isn't the wholesome snack your inebriated senses would have you believe.

But in case the health inspector warnings and memory of last Friday night's meat sweats didn't fully register, take heed of this cautionary kebab tale.

As the BBC reports, Hertfordshire police stopped a van during rush hour traffic on the M25 this week after it appeared to be "dragging its rear down the road."

READ MORE: What Your Favourite Chefs Order in Their Kebabs After a Night Out

Upon asking the driver to open the back of the van, officers soon found the reason for the droopy rear-end. The vehicle was stuffed full of frozen kebab meat and chicken. Crammed on top of it all, like some bizarre game of Tetris, was a shopping trolley.

Tweeting about the incident from the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, and Hertfordshire Roads Policing Unit, the officers wrote: "Veh [vehicle] stopped M25 found to be half a tonne overweight with frozen kebab meat! Prohibited until unloaded."

While the van was properly refridgerated, Hertfordshire police constable Ben Pitelen told the BBC that the "condition the meat was found in was a little suspect." He added: "You're not really supposed to bung a load of meat in a van and shove a shopping trolley on top. It's a new one on me."

Same.

READ MORE: Meet the London Chef Making Meat on a Stick a Thing of Beauty

After being stopped by police, the driver called a colleague who helped transport his kebab cargo to an address in Woking, Surrey, where it had been destined after purchase from a market in London that morning.

Woking: you have been warned. The journey your lamb shish made to that polystyrene container is a little more complicated than farm-to-table.